Knipe Point, Cayton Bay, North Yorkshire

Landslide case study

In April 2008, a landslide occurred on the wooded slope at Cayton Bay in North Yorkshire, just south of Scarborough (Figure 1). This is a large landslide complex (Fish et al., 2006) and throughout April, reports of landslide activity were occurring nearly daily and were reported in both the local and national media. The slope movements resulted in two properties being demolished and other properties in the Knipe Point Estate and the A165 Filey Road being threatened. This landslide is currently undergoing investigation by various organisations.

Specialist staff from the BGS Landslides Team carried out a walk-over survey of the landslide to record the nature and location of the mass movement for entry into the National Landslide Database. The BGS routinely responds to major landslide events in this way, sending specialist staff to the scene of landslide events to collate data from landslides whilst they are relatively fresh and often active, offering invaluable information.

Figure 1 Location of Cayton Bay, North Yorkshire. The black point marks the position of the backscarp. National Landslide Database ID 6882/1 and 6882/2.
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Figure 1 Location of Cayton Bay, North Yorkshire. The black point marks the position of the backscarp. National Landslide Database ID 6882/1 and 6882/2.

Photo gallery

The following are a series of photographs taken during the walk-over survey:

References

Fish, P, Carey, J and Moore, R. 2006. Landslide Geomorphology of Cayton Bay, North Yorkshire. Proceedings of the Yorkshire Geological Society 56 (1) p.5–14

Contact the Landslide Response Team

Tel: 0115 936 3143 Email: landslides@bgs.ac.uk

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