Dr Andrew Christopher Smith

Dr Andrew Christopher Smith

Isotope Geochemist

Location: BGS Keyworth

Tel: 0115 936 3541

E-mail Dr Andrew Christopher Smith

ORCID: 0000-0002-7658-6234

Biography

  • 2015 – ongoing : Stable Isotope Geochemist, NERC Isotope Geosciences Facility, British Geological Survey
  • 2015 –2015 : Stable Isotope Apprentice, NERC Isotope Geosciences Facility, British Geological Survey
  • 2010 –2014 : PhD from the University of Lancaster entitiled: Speleothem Climate Capture – A Holocene Reconstruction of Northern Iberian Climate and Environmental Change

Boards and committees

  • 2018 : Chief Scientist British Cave Monitoring Centre
  • 2018 : Trustee and board member: British Cave Research Association

Key papers

Published outputs

Research interests

  • The use of light stable isotopes as tracers to help us understand nutrient cycling and the impact of pollution on modern environments.
  • Developing instrumentation for the automated high precision dual hydrogen and carbon isotope analysis of methane. With the aim of identifying methane origins, flow pathways, mixing dynamics and potential pollution impacts within subsurface aquifers. Also interested in understanding the role methane forming microbes play in the C cycle with the aim of characterising major sources of future methane pollution into the atmosphere.
  • Developing methods for the tracing of phosphorus through soil and aquatic environments, with special focus on biological fractionations of phosphate oxygen isotopes in nature.
  • Light stable isotope geochemistry focused on understanding fractionations in oxygen and carbon isotopes during organic matter (both diatoms and vascular plants) decay and sedimentation.
  • Quaternary and especially Holocene palaeoclimate reconstruction using speleothem deposits, focusing on how changes in the North Atlantic Ocean are transmitted to atmospheric systems and terrestrial records.
  • Developing techniques that will allow for the analysis of phosphate oxygen isotopes from minimal amounts of speleothem carbonate.
  • The monitoring of the cave climate system particularly focused on understanding how changes in cave ventilation can influence drip water chemistry over a range of timescales.