Pore-scale dynamics and the multiphase Darcy law

Dataset description

A pore-scale experimental investigation of microscopic steady-state flow during co-injection from very low to high flow rates in the pore space of a sandstone is applied using 4D synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography to advance our understanding of flow regimes. We report the results of micro-CT imaging experiments directly visualizing the simultaneous flow of both a wetting and a non-wetting fluid through a Bentheimer sandstone, at pore-scale resolution. For small flow rates, both fluids flow through unchanging, distinct, bicontinuous 3D pathways. At higher flow rates, however, the non-wetting fluid continually breaks up into discrete ganglia; these are then advected through the medium. We propose that the non-wetting fluid breaks up when the sum of the viscous forces exerted by the wetting and the non-wetting fluids exceed the capillary forces at the pore scale.

Constraints

Imperial College London gratefully acknowledge permission to publish and funding from the Qatar Carbonates and Carbon Storage Research Centre (QCCSRC), provided jointly by Qatar Petroleum, Shell, and Qatar Science & Technology Park. Qatar Petroleum remain copyright owner.

Further information

For more information please contact:

Enquiries

Environmental Science Centre, Nicker Hill, Keyworth
Nottingham
NG12 5GG

Tel : +44 (0)115 936 3143
Fax :+44 (0)115 936 3276
Email :enquiries@bgs.ac.uk

Associated dataset(s)

Qatar Carbonates and Carbon Storage Research Centre (QCCSRC)

Dataset details

Author(s) Martin Blunt , Branko Bijeljic , Ying Gao
Principal Investigator(s) Not available
Language English
Curator British Geological Survey
Supply media/format Raw; Version:NA
Storage format Not available
Frequency of update not applicable
Start of capture {ts '2017-12-09 00:00:00'} Not known
End of capture {ts '2017-12-12 00:00:00'} 12th December 2017
Online access URL various
Lineage statement 1. A dry scan was taken with 2 MPa confining pressure. 2. The brine-saturated sample was scanned. A back pressure of 2,000 kPa was set for the whole system. 3. Oil was injected at 2 mL/min for 30 minutes to reach the initial water saturation. 4. Water and oil were injected when fw were 0.15 and 0.3 by keeping the total volumetric flow rate fixed at 0.02 mL/min for one and half hours respectively. 5. Water and oil were injected at equal flow rate of 0.01 mL/min respectively. At the same time, the pressure drop across the whole sample was recorded. Two more hours were waited after the pressure stabilized. Successive scans were taken from the start without stopping. 6. The total flow rate was increased to 0.04 mL/min, 0.08 mL/min, 0.4 mL/min, 0.8 mL/min and 1.2 mL/min step by step when fractional flow was kept at 0.5. For each flow rate, two more hours were waited until steady state.
Supplementary information
Constraints
Access constraints licenceOGL (Open Government Licence)
Use constraints licenceOGL (Open Government Licence)
Additional info on constraints Imperial College London gratefully acknowledge permission to publish and funding from the Qatar Carbonates and Carbon Storage Research Centre (QCCSRC), provided jointly by Qatar Petroleum, Shell, and Qatar Science & Technology Park. Qatar Petroleum remain copyright owner.
Contact details
Department Enquiries
Organisation British Geological Survey
Address Environmental Science Centre, Nicker Hill, Keyworth
City Nottingham
County Nottinghamshire
Country United Kingdom
Postcode NG12 5GG
E-mail enquiries@bgs.ac.uk
Telephone +44 (0)115 936 3143
Fax +44 (0)115 936 3276
Keywords
Topic category code (ISO) geoscientificInformation (information pertaining to earth sciences)
Keywords DARCYS LAW
FLUID FLOW
CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE
Keyword source BGS Keyphrases
Spatial details
Spatial Reference System Not available
Dataset extent
Coverage (Lat/Long) North boundary : 
East boundary  : 
South boundary : 
West boundary  : 
Metadata
Metadata language English
Metadata last updated 25th February 2019
Metadata standard compliance NERC profile of ISO19115:2003
Copyright and IPR
The copyright of materials derived from the British Geological Survey's work is vested in the Natural Environment Research Council [NERC]. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, or stored in a retrieval system of any nature, without the prior permission of the copyright holder, via the BGS Intellectual Property Rights Manager. Use by customers of information provided by the BGS, is at the customer's own risk. In view of the disparate sources of information at BGS's disposal, including such material donated to BGS, that BGS accepts in good faith as being accurate, the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) gives no warranty, expressed or implied, as to the quality or accuracy of the information supplied, or to the information's suitability for any use. NERC/BGS accepts no liability whatever in respect of loss, damage, injury or other occurence however caused.