Introduction

The role of geo-environmental information is becoming increasingly important as legislative changes have forced developers, planning authorities and regulators to consider more fully the implications and impact on the environment of large-scale development initiatives.

Projects

To comply with the principles of sustainable development, developers are increasingly required to demonstrate that proposals are based on the best possible scientific information and analysis of risk. Nowhere is this more relevant than in the context of the urban environment.
Major infrastructure projects depend on site investigation studies to identify ground conditions, and to ensure that construction design is not compromised. By integrating this information across major conurbations, the British Geological Survey is providing a unifying 3D framework for characterising the shallow subsurface in terms that are relevant to engineers, planners and developers.

Current applied urban geological studies use state-of-the-art GIS and 3D modelling packages to develop digital geological models as a basis for geological interpretations and hydrogeological, geochemical and engineering ground assessments. By making this information more readily accessible, the planning of major developments, ground investigation and reclamation studies can be carried out on a more informed basis.

High priority is currently being given to support greenfield and Urban geoscience in five major conurbations:

  • Thames Gateway
  • Clyde Basin
  • Manchester and the Lower Mersey Corridor
  • Swansea-Port Talbot
  • Belfast

Completed applied urban geological mapping projects

Other urban areas investigated by BGS in England and Wales are listed below:

Other urban areas investigated by BGS in England and Wales

  1. Bournemouth-Poole (1986)
  2. Bridgend (1985)
  3. Brierley (1991)
  4. Exeter (1985)
  5. Newcastle (1982-83)
  6. South Humberside (1983)
  7. Fareham & Havant (1984-85)
  8. Cramlington-Killingworth Wide-open (1985)
  9. Ponteland-Morpeth (1986)
  10. South-east Leeds (1988)
  11. West Wiltshire & South-east Avon (1985)
  12. Aldridge-Brownhills (1984)
  13. Deeside (2988)
  14. Garforth-Castleford-Pontefract (1990)
  15. Southampton (1987)
  16. Coventry (1989)
  17. Crosby-Bootle-Aintree (Sefton)(1986)
  18. Dearham & Gilcrux, West Cumbria (1989)
  1. Workington & Maryport, West Cumbria (1988)
  2. Nottingham (1990)
  3. Wrexham (1991)
  4. Morpeth-Bedlington-Ashington (1990)
  5. Stoke-on-Trent (1991)
  6. South West Essex (1991)
  7. Black Country (1992)
  8. Great Broughton & Lamplugh (1992)
  9. Leeds (1992)
  10. Wigan (1995)
  11. Bradford (1996)
  12. Plymouth: Gaps (1985)
  13. Chacewater: Freeman Fox & Partners (1987)
  14. Bristol: Howard Humpries (1987)
  15. Torbay: Geomorphological Services (1989)
  16. St Helens: Rendel Geotechnics (1992)
  17. Severn Levels: Wallace Evans (1994)

Contact

For further information contact: enquiries@bgs.ac.uk.