BUFI students on GeoBlogy

GeoBlogyFor a glimpse into the research our students do along with their wonderful and varied field trips read the contributions they have made to the BGS Blog – GeoBlogy.
2016

March 2016: IODP Expedition 346 - 2nd post - cruise meeting... by Sonja Felder, PhD student at Newcastle University

Sonja Felder

G'day everyone, I just started the second year of my PhD researching the environmental and climatic development of the Sea of Japan/ East Sea during the last ˜1 Million years...

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February 2016: Mapping Hidden Hunger in Malawi... by Edward Joy and Louise Ander

Fieldwork in Malawi; Cultivation and weeding are usually done by small-holder farmers using a hand-held hoe; Locally grown leafy green vegetables being sold at a market in northern Malawi.

Edward Joy and Louise Ander describe how recently created maps of Malawi predict spatial variation in the dietary supply of seven essential elements (calcium, copper, iodine, iron, magnesium, selenium and zinc)...

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January 2016: A new PhD researching the effects of variation in the orbit of the Earth around the sun... by Savannah Worne

Savannah Worne

Hello, my name is Savannah and I have just started my PhD within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry, between the University of Nottingham School of Geography and the BGS...

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2015

December 2015: Going South Part 3: Doing some science!... by Rowan Dejardin

Rowan collecting samples from the seafloor sediment

As described in my previous blogs, I’m travelling south with the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) to collect samples from the South Georgia shelf, as part of my PhD (jointly funded by the BGS and the University of Nottingham, and within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry)...

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November 2015: The start of my PhD research into iodine deficiency... by Olivier Humphrey

The start of my PhD research into iodine deficiency

Hi, my name is Olivier and I have just started my PhD within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry (University of Nottingham and the BGS)...

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November 2015: Going South Part 2: Signy Relief... by PhD student Rowan Dejardin

Rowan on board

As described in my previous blog, I’m travelling south with the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) to collect samples from the South Georgia shelf, as part of my PhD (jointly funded by the BGS and the University of Nottingham, and within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry)...

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November 2015: Going South Part 1: How to get to the Falkland Islands... by Rowan Dejardin

Rowan Dejardin

My PhD project (jointly funded by BGS and the University of Nottingham and within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry) is focussed on trying to reconstruct changes in ocean conditions through the last 15000 years around the Subantarctic island of South Georgia...

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October 2015: The Urbino Summer School in Paleoclimatology... by PhD students Hennie Detlef and Amy Sparkes

USSP Field Trip

From 15 July to 1 August, 71 students from all over the world came together in the small town of Urbino, Italy to attend the 12th Urbino Summer School in Paleoclimatology (USSP)...

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October 2015: The International Ocean Discovery Program (UK) Student Conference 2015... by Rowan Dejardin

The Joides Resolution (JR), the IODP’s flagship vessel (courtesy of UK-IODP).

In late September 2015 29 PhD students from across the UK headed to Northumberland to learn about the scientific work carried out by the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP)...

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September 2015: Drilling into the Bowland Shale... by Joe Emmings

Joe in the field acquiring Bowland Shale samples from outcrop with the help of a hand-held core drill.

Joe Emmings is a field geologist and a first year PhD student at the University of Leicester and the BGS. Joe's PhD research is on the Carboniferous-aged Bowland Shale in the UK...

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September 2015: 20th QRA Annual International Postgraduate Symposium... by Jack Lacey

Symposium group photo outside the Scott Polar Institute, Cambridge.

In early September, the Quaternary Research Association (QRA) hosted their annual symposium exclusively for postgraduate (PhD and MSc) students at the University of Cambridge...

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September 2015: Seismology, geodynamics and beautiful Copenhagen... by Rose Hen-Jones

Nyhavn, the beautiful 17th century waterfront of Copenhagen.

Earlier this month, Newcastle University PhD student Rose headed to Denmark to attend the tenth elite PhD training course at the University of Copenhagen, on using Seismology and Geodynamics to quantify earth's internal processes. Rose tells us all about it...

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August 2015: Hidden landscapes in the city: the world of urban gardens and allotments... by Jon Stubberfield

Preparing for a day down at the allotment Dale allotments in Sneinton, Nottingham.

Hi, my name is Jon and I am a PhD student at the University of Nottingham. The demand for urban gardens and allotments is on the rise as is the pressure for space in our towns and cities...

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August 2015: Limnogeology and the biggest little city in the world... by Jack Lacey

Jack, Jonathan and Melanie in downtown Reno.

Hi, my name is Jon and I am a PhD student at the University of Nottingham. The demand for urban gardens and allotments is on the rise as is the pressure for space in our towns and cities...

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July 2015: Caves hold clues to past climate... by Laura Deeprose

Laura entering the cave; getting in and out is a tight squeeze!

Often people look at stalagmites and stalactites within caves and admire their strange shapes and fascinating formations...

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May 2015: Chromium in crops... by Elliott Hamilton

Elliott Hamilton (right) sampling with partners from CBU and ZARI

Chromium, the 22nd most abundant element in our Earth's crust, takes many different forms...

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May 2015: Sea shells on the sea bed... by Henrieka Detlef

Henrieka Detlef

Henrieka Detlef is using shells which are over a million years old to reconstruct the different climatic components of the Bering Sea...

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2014

December 2014: Life in our ancient oceans... by Sonja Felder

Sonja Felder

Sonja is just starting out on a journey, travelling back through millions of years of Earth's history, to understand what impacts past climate changes had on the delicate life in our oceans...

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November 2014: South Georgia and ancient algal blooms... by Rowan Dejardin

Rowan Dejardin

South Georgia is a strikingly beautiful, uninhabited island in the Southern Ocean, west of Patagonia and hundreds of miles from any major landmasses...

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July 2014: Food security in Malaysia... by Diriba Kumssa

Food security in Malaysia

Food security and sustainable development are a high priority for scientists around the globe and this summer a multidisciplinary team from the UK travelled to Malaysia to help build collective research partnerships between various government and non-government organisations (NGOs)...

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October 2014: Lake Ohrid project team ASSEMBLE... by Jack Lacey

Workshop group photo

569 meters of core, 1.2 million years of history, and a multi-disciplinary international team of scientists: It can only be the ICDP SCOPSCO Lake Ohrid Deep Drilling Project!...

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September 2014: Hidden hunger in Malawi... by Edward Joy

Edward in his panama hat out in Malawi

A few months back we shared a great post about the award winning PhD student (working at BGS and University of Nottingham) Edward Joy, whose project tackles the important issue of hidden hunger in Malawi. Now Edward tells us in his own words about his research and years of research in the field...

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August 2014: Paper pride... by Jack Lacey

Jack Lacey

We proudly invited Jack, star blogger and PhD student at CEG (Centre for Environmental Geochemistry), to write about his very first lead authorship paper because it's a great academic and personal achievement worthy of cake, bubbles and blogging!...

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July 2014: Prize winning Joy... by Michael Watts Edward Joy's BGS supervisor

Edward in his panama hat out in Malawi

It's with great pride we share with you the super achievements of one of our sponsored PhD students Edward Joy. Edward is a student of the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry (CEG) and has won prizes both at the University of Nottingham (UoN) and BGS for his PhD research. His BGS supervisor Michael Watts sent us this...

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July 2014: The Ohrid Sequel: Cheshire Mere... by Jack Lacey

Myself (left) and my collaborators on Rostherne Mere (Prof Melanie Leng, Dr Dave Ryves and Dr Chris Vane).

Jack Lacey is a familiar face to the blog. Over the last 16 months he's taken us along on amazing fieldwork adventures to Lake Ohrid, drilling through 3 million years of Earth's history and looking for the impacts of volcanic super eruptions using lake sediment records...

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June 2014: BUFI Science Festival... by Jack Lacey

Presenters all ready for the Science Festival.

Last fortnight saw us celebrate the amazing work of over 80 post graduate research students at the annual BUFI (BGS University Funding Initiative) Festival...

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2013

August 2013: Reflections on the first year of my PhD... by Jack Lacey

Me on night shift duty on the drilling platform in May.

As a PhD student of the British Geological Survey and University of Leicester Jack aims to use lake sediments to reconstruct N Hemisphere/Mediterranean climate change over the past 2 million years...

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June 2013: Spot the Geologist - the start of my PhD... by Leah Nolan

Leah and Peter with their supervisory team from Leicester & BGS

Leah starts her PhD research, in Geology at Leicester University and in association with the BGS, in October. Here she describes her first field visit to the picturesque Lathkill Dale in the Peak District where famous Lower Carboniferous limestones out crop...

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May 2013: Lake Ohrid borehole hits 568m... by Jack Lacey

Drill tool showing bit and core catcher

I arrived in Macedonia just over a week ago and travelled to Lake Ohrid in the south west of the Former Yugoslavian Republic. The drilling and science team had just completed a 568 meter hole!...

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