Planning4Minerals header
 
 Home
 Planning
  Influence of EU
 Role of central government
 Role of regional bodies
 Enviro protection/heritage
 Role of elected members
 Local communities
 Planning process
  Sustainability
 Future aggregate sites
 Commercial interests
 Planning permission
 Restoration
 Enforcing planning rights
 Environment
  Landscape
 Natural and built heritage
 Noise and vibration
 Transport and traffic
 Air quality
 Water resources
 Mineral waste
 Biodiversity
 Geodiversity
 Resources
  What are aggregates?
 Resources vs Reserves
 Location of aggregates
 Quarry design/restoration
 Aggregate process
 Aggregate testing
 Economics
  Aggregates use
 Supply and demand
 Value to economy
 Regional supply issues
 Local economy
 Transportation issues
 Links
 Glossary
 Site map
 Notes for trainers
 Downloads
   
  
Planning

What is the role of regional bodies in the aggregates planning system?

Why is this important?
There is now a strong emphasis on the regions within the UK and the English Regions have a significant role to play in the formulation of planning policy. They form an essential interface between policies at the national and local level, acting to focus on key issues for the region, set priorities and the core policies that form the basis of the Regional Spatial Strategy (RSS).

Although Planning Policy Statements and Guidance Notes set out the Government's national policies for planning in England, it is at the regional level where the strategic policy framework is established and, for aggregate minerals, where the level of provision for aggregates supply across the region is determined and which in turn identifies what level of aggregate provision is needed by individual Mineral Planning Authorities (MPA).

Regional assemblies
     
The role of the Regional Assemblies is to act as an advocate for their region at the national and international level, to ensure the accountability and liaison with other regional organisations, including the delivery of economic development aspirations through the Regional Development Agencies, and to provide for the appropriate spatial planning of growth within the region, consistent with environmental and social objectives.
 
There is a Rregional Assembly in each of the regions of the UK and although they are a relatively new body, their role is already well developed and enshrined within key legislation, including that relating to planning. The Regional Assembly for any region consists mainly of elected representatives nominated by the constituent local authorities in each of the English Regions. There are also regional representatives from the voluntary sector, environmental groups, faith communities, business and economic partnerships, education establishments and town parish councils.

The role of the Regional Assemblies is to act as an advocate for their region at the national and international level, to ensure the accountability and liaison with other regional organisations, including the delivery of economic development aspirations through the Regional Development Agencies, and to provide for the appropriate spatial planning of growth within the region, consistent with environmental and social objectives.

The Rregional Assemblies took over the role of the Regional Planning Bodies (RPBs) which were previously established in each of the regions in England to advise the Regional Government Office on regional planning policy. Under the new system the RPBs prepare and agree the Regional Minerals Strategy as part of the wider Regional Spatial Strategy (RSS), which sets the overall policies for development, the environment, economy and social issues relating to land-use change across the region.
     
The RSS is prepared by the Regional Assembly and will replace all Regional Planning Guidance by 2008.
  Regions of the UK

The RSS is prepared by the Regional Assembly and will replace all Regional Planning Guidance by 2008.

They are currently under preparation in most areas and will replace structure plans as they gain approval. They will provide a broad vision and development strategy for a region for at least 15 years. Amongst other things they will identify the scale and distribution of new housing and priorities for the environment, transport, infrastructure, economic development, agriculture, mineral extraction and waste treatment and disposal.

Importantly Regional Spatial Strategies now form part of the Development Plan. One of the roles of the Strategies is to establish the strategic direction of future development e.g. growth areas. This will have implications for the supply of aggregates to support the broader range of development needs in these areas.


Levels of mineral planning governance

Levels of mineral planning governance, from the national to the local.


. . . more