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The scale of human impact on our planet has changed the course of Earth's history, an international team of researchers has concluded. Dr Colin Waters, a researcher with the British Geological Survey and the chair of The Anthropocene Working Group said: 'The Anthropocene Working Group is now working on such a proposal, based upon finding a 'golden spike' - a reference level within recent strata somewhere in the world that will best characterize the changes of the Anthropocene.

2017-10-02


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The British Geological Survey (BGS) is the world’s oldest national survey and the premier centre in the UK for earth science expertise. Executive Director Professor John Ludden is dedicated to advising government and industry on how to face geological challenges. We caught up with him at to discuss the BGS’s focus of understanding earth and environmental processes as well as delivering impartial advice in all areas of geoscience in the UK and internationally.

2017-10-20


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New guidance to safeguard and manage Northern Ireland’s rocks and landscape has been produced by the Geological Survey of Northern Ireland (GSNI). Dr Kirstin Lemon, Team Leader of Information and Infrastructure at the GSNI tells us: “Understanding and managing Northern Ireland’s geodiversity has never been so important. With increasing pressures on our resources and our environment, we need to provide guidance on how we can safeguard and manage this for current and future generations.”

2017-10-23


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A team of scientists matched stone in statues and religious icons to a quarry in the French Alps, reconstructing a medieval European art trade route. Jane A. Evans, an isotope geochemist from the British Geological Survey called the paper “well-constructed” and said the technique “could be extended to look at a wider range of carvings from differing periods, and they could extend their fingerprinting methods to incorporate other isotope and geochemical methods.”

2017-10-23


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The remains of the small creature called Tiny were found in the Scottish Borders. 360-345 million years ago, Scotland lay close to the Equator and its land was hot. Researcher say Tiny was one of the first four-legged creatures to move onto land. The findings fills in a 15-million year fossil gap when fish transitioned to land life. David Millward, a geologist at NERC's British Geological Survey, said: 'Every specimen tells us something new.'

2017-10-24


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Scientists are now able to date the end of the last ice age in Scotland with a greater degree of certainty than ever before, thanks to new research. Britice-Chrono is a five-year project funded by the Natural Environment Research Council. Partners include the British Geological Survey (BGS), Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre and British Antarctic Survey. Samples were collected using BGS’s hi-tech Vibrocorer.

2017-10-26


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Humans were creating astonishing cave paintings in the Caribbean thousands of years before the arrival of Christopher Columbus, reveals new research. New research – by academics from Leicester University and the British Museum working with colleagues from the British Geological Survey and Cambridge University, – reveals key discoveries including how the rock-art was made and paint recipes.

2017-10-30