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A spate of sinkholes have appeared as the constant heavy rainfall has flooded much of the UK, Dr Vanessa Banks explains why this is happening and the warning signs to look out for that your property could be at risk... Dr Vanessa Banks of the British Geological Survey said that the holes appear when the layers of earth, gravel and clay above becoming so saturated with water they can no longer support their own weight.

2014-02-19


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Sinkholes are appearing across Britain as rain batters the UK and floods continue to swamp some areas - but what are they, and is heavy rain really to blame for that sinking feeling? ... Dr Vanessa Banks from the British Geological Survey, told Channel 4 News: 'The ground is saturated at the moment, in certain parts of the country, and where it's saturated, it will remain saturated for some weeks, if not months.'

2014-02-18


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Three homes have been evacuated in a street in North Yorkshire after a 25ft-wide (7.5m) sinkhole opened... Dr Vanessa Banks, from the British Geological Survey, explained to the BBC why recent heavy rainfall had led to an 'increased number' of sinkholes.

2014-02-18


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Groundwater levels are so high in some parts of the country that flooding is likely to persist for weeks or even months, experts say... Scientists at the British Geological Survey (BGS) say levels are likely to keep rising even if there is no more rain, as so much water is soaking through the soil. A BGS report last month said water levels had risen by more than 30 metres in some observation wells in chalk in Hampshire.

2014-02-13


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LEC’s partnership with the British Geological Survey is strengthened with the joint appointment of a geochemist to work on geological carbon dioxide storage... The British Geological Survey (BGS) has the UK’s highest concentration of scientists working on carbon storage, and Niko’s appointment is part of a new initiative at the BGS to form stronger research collaborations with UK universities.

2014-02-13


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Experts are warning that flooding in large parts of southern England and in some areas of Wales, could last for months - because the groundwater is so high. But what does this mean? Well, Newsround asked a groundwater expert to explain it to us. Emily Crane works for the British Geological Survey (BGS) - an organisation made up of Earth scientists such as geologists.

2014-02-12


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... Andrew McKenzie, a water expert with the survey, said: 'What we saw [in the floods] of 2000-2001 was groundwater flooding persisting well into the spring and the last remnants of groundwater flooding finished in about May of 2001. So we certainly are expecting to see many more months of groundwater issues.'

2014-02-12


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Because so much water needs to soak through the soil, parts of the South will face the serious risk of flooding for months to come. Even if the rain stopped today, groundwater levels could keep on rising until the Spring, as Martin stew explains... with BGS hydrogeologist, David Macdonald.

2014-02-12


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... Andrew McKenzie, hydrogeologist from the British Geological Survey, said the flooding emergency is likely to continue for months... He said: 'Groundwater flooding could last until May even if the rain stops, as the levels are so high. The aquifers are at their highest levels since 2001.'

2014-02-12


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'We are in uncharted territories,' said Andrew McKenzie, a groundwater expert at the British Geological Survey, explaining that the extreme rains had led to 'spectacular rises' in some of the aquifers that lie beneath large parts of the country. This could see flooded streets and sewage system problems persist 'for months' in some parts, he said, though it was difficult to know for certain. 'It’s really hard. We haven’t seen two months like this in a very long historical record,' he said.

2014-02-12


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Andrew McKenzie, hydrogeologist from the British Geological Survey, warned 'we are expecting to see many more months of groundwater issues'...Groundwater flooding could remain in some areas south of the Thames Valley from Reading to Salisbury until spring, said Andrew McKenzie, hydrogeologist from the British Geological Survey. For instance, groundwater levels in the Chalk aquifer at Tilshead on Salisbury Plain rose by 20 metres in just two weeks, Mr McKenzie said.

2014-02-11


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Groundwater levels are so high in some parts of the country that flooding is likely to persist for weeks or even months, reports suggest. A scientist with the British Geological Survey (BGS) said levels were likely to keep rising even if there was no more rain as so much water was soaking through the soil. He told the BBC waters could keep increasing for months. The BGS runs 32 boreholes across the country to measure water levels

2014-02-11


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More wet weather is affecting flood-stricken parts of the UK, with severe flood warnings in place along the Thames and in Somerset... Andrew McKenzie, a groundwater scientist at the British Geological Survey, said there had been 'really spectacular rises in water levels' in its aquifers. He told the BBC: 'I think it's fair to say that certainly across much of southern Britain and certainly across much of the catchment of the River Thames aquifers are very close to being fully saturated.'

2014-02-11


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Scientists have told Sky News that groundwater levels are now so high that parts of Britain face a serious risk of flooding for weeks or even months to come. Andy McKenzie, a groundwater scientist at the British Geological Survey, told Sky News that even if the rain stopped today, so much water is soaking through the soil that levels are likely to keep rising for another two months. The risk of flooding could remain high until May, he said.

2014-02-11


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Hard as it is to believe now, two years ago the UK was seriously preparing for drought. Since then there's been a lot of rain, so does it mean there won't be hosepipe bans for many years?... Groundwater provides the water companies - via pumping - with about 30% of the water consumed in the UK, says Rob Ward, a director at the British Geological Survey. In parts of south-east England, such as Kent, the majority of water comes from aquifers.

2014-02-06


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National Grid’s latest Interim Management Statement published today says that its recent investment in flood defences in the UK has minimised the impact of recent bad weather... Work started as long ago as 2008 with the determination of flooding risk which involved gathering data from National Grid, the Environment Agency and the British Geological survey to determine risk of flooding to the distribution system.

2014-01-30


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National Grid’s latest Interim Management Statement published today says that its recent investment in flood defences in the UK has minimised the impact of recent bad weather... Work started as long ago as 2008 with the determination of flooding risk which involved gathering data from National Grid, the Environment Agency and the British Geological survey to determine risk of flooding to the distribution system.

2014-01-30


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A Nottinghamshire town believed to be the most ‘seismically active’ area in the UK has experienced more than 30 small earthquakes in the last 50 days... The British Geological Survey said it is possible that all of the tremors in the area have originated from the same location... The BGS said: ‘Earthquakes of this size are not likely to cause any damage and the hazard from mining-induced seismicity in the UK is typically low.’

2014-01-29


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A Nottinghamshire town believed to be the most ‘seismically active’ area in the UK has experienced more than 30 small earthquakes in the last 50 days... The British Geological Survey said it is possible that all of the tremors in the area have originated from the same location... The BGS said: ‘Earthquakes of this size are not likely to cause any damage and the hazard from mining-induced seismicity in the UK is typically low.’

2014-01-29


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A town which has experienced 30 earthquakes in 50 days is currently the 'most seismically active' area in the British Isles, seismologists have said. The recent tremors in and around New Ollerton, Nottinghamshire, have been attributed to mining. The British Geological Survey (BGS) said the 'swarm' of tremors were not likely to cause damage and could soon reduce again.

2014-01-21

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