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It’s a blustery winter day on the English coast and Nicola Bayless is walking along the Happisburgh cliffs with her daughter Darcy, surveying the damage after a recent storm. The North Sea has been eating away at Happisburgh’s cliffs for 5,000 years. Estimates put the average historical rate of erosion at somewhere between one and three feet per year, according to Catherine Pennington, a geologist with the British Geological Survey.

2018-04-05


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An earthquake which left many residents in Mole Valley and near Horley feeling "shakes" and "quivers" is the first ever to be recorded in Surrey. Hitting a magnitude of 2.7 on the Richter scale with a depth of 5km, the British Geological Survey (BGS) confirmed it is the first to be based in the county, with its epicentre in Newdigate in the Mole Valley. BGS seismologist David Galloway said it was "rare" for an earthquake to take place in the south-east region.

2018-04-02


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VITAL research is underway to help to tackle alarming levels of arsenic in food and drink in parts of India and Bangladesh. A team from Salford, Manchester, Birmingham, the British Geological Survey and four institutes in India including the National Institute of Hydrology have received funding from NERC, the UK’s Natural Environment Research Council to find methods to better predict arsenic levels in water.

2018-03-26


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A new 45-mile trail exploring three billion years of geological history is being launched on a Highland peninsula. The Geotrail in Coigach will offer some of the best viewpoints of the west coast near Achiltibuie. The trail has been produced in collaboration with the North West Highlands Geopark and the British Geological Survey.

2018-03-26


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A 2-billion-year-old chunk of sea salt provides new evidence for the transformation of Earth's atmosphere into an oxygenated environment capable of supporting life as we know it. The study by an international team of institutions including Princeton University found that the rise in oxygen that occurred about 2.3 billion years ago, known as the Great Oxidation Event, was much more substantial than previously indicated.

2018-03-22


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Black clay deposit indicates the London suburb was once a woodland marsh by the sea. Dave Entwistle, an engineering geologist at the British Geological Survey said it was very unusual to find such deposits in that area.

2018-03-16


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A minor earthquake has been recorded in Gwynedd, the British Geological Survey has said. It was described as a "definite but indistinct low frequency audible rumble". It was of 2.7 magnitude - a level classed as only able to cause minor damage.

2018-03-09


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A MASSIVE 5.3-magnitude earthquake has hit Papua New Guinea – raising fears that the Big One is about to hit the region. David Galloway, a seismologist at the British Geological Survey, has recently revealed fears the so-called Ring of Fire is about to “snap”. He said: "We expect a big one to happen in Japan and another one in California. Stress has been building up over the years."

2018-03-06


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The news that Brits are living on shaky ground comes after a 4.6 quake struck in Wales last week, and was reported to be the strongest to have hit the UK in 10 years. The British Geological Survey has registered the specific location of the quake to be the village of Cwmllynfell near Swansea. BGS figures show that four others struck in Cwmllynfell the same day.

2018-02-25


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Curling stones in the Olympics all come from the tiny Scottish island of Ailsa Craig. As the volcanic rock crystallized, it developed a strong, uniform surface. “When magma cools quickly, it creates very small crystals. These ones interlocked, and chemical bonds developed between them,” says Martin Gillespie, a geologist at the British Geological Survey.

2018-02-24


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A guest blog from the British Geological Survey about the UK Geoenergy Observatories project. The project aims to create an observatory which will study the subsurface, in order to contribute to the responsible development of new energy technologies in the UK and internationally.

2018-02-22


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Something stirred deep below the surface of a small village in the Upper Swansea Valley on Saturday afternoon which quite literally shook the world. According to the British Geological Survey (BGS), at 2.31pm on Saturday tectonic movements in the Earth’s crust, 7km below Cwmllynfell, took place resulting in an earthquake which measured 4.4 on the Richter scale. But why did it happen, and will there be more to come? The BGS has the answers.

2018-02-19


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The largest earthquake to hit the UK for a decade has struck in Wales and been felt as far away as Birmingham, the British Geological Survey (BGS) has confirmed. The BGS said earthquakes of this magnitude occur in the UK around once every two to three years.

2018-02-17


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Climate change is real. Demand for energy is relentless. Never has it been more important to find new clean, secure and affordable ways of powering our future. The £31m UK Geoenergy Observatories is such an investment. It will create two research sites in Cheshire and in Glasgow that will advance understanding across geological disciplines and provide real environments for studying potential energy technologies.

2018-02-11


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Scientists understand that Earth’s magnetic field has flipped its polarity many times over the millennia. Many disaster scenarios associated with geomagnetic pole reversals in popular imagination are pure fantasy. When the last pole switch happened, “no worldwide shifting of continents or other planet-wide disasters occurred, as geoscientists can testify to from fossil and other records,” said Alan Thompson, head of geomagnetism at the British Geological Survey.

2018-02-06


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Research into extracting the lithium from brine in the tin mines has been given £850,000 worth of funding. The new project will use satellites to analyse images geology and vegetation, picking out the best places for further exploration – and cutting down on costs. British mining company Cornish Lithium is taking part in the project with the state-backed Satellite Applications Catapult, along with the British Geological Survey, the Camborne School of Mines and North Coast Consulting.

2018-01-25


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Seismologists expect big earthquakes to hit Japan and California but are not able to say when it will happen. David Galloway, a seismologist at the British Geological Survey, studies earthquakes all over the globe. He told Mirror Online that it is only a matter of time before a big one strikes again. "We expect a big one to happen in Japan and another one in California. Stress has been building up over the years," he explained.

2018-01-24


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A 7.9 magnitude earthquake struck around 160 miles (250 km) southeast of Chiniak, Alaska, at a depth of 25 km, at 9.31am GMT (12.31am local time) on Tuesday. Davie Galloway, a seismologist for the British Geological Survey (BGS), told Express.co.uk that following the most powerful quake near Alaska, there will be a stream of aftershocks that could have a similar impact.

2018-01-23


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A Canary Islands volcano threatens to send a mountain cascading into the sea and triggering a monster tsunami. Professor David Tappin, a tsunami specialist at the British Geological Survey, told the Sun Online: "The UK has been impacted by tsunamis in the past. Their major hazard is that they can be generated at one location and then they can travel long distances across the ocean and still be dangerous."

2018-01-23


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A £6.5m grant has been awarded to pump naturally-heated water from an old coal mine and use it to heat 150 homes. A feasibility study is ongoing until the end of February and the British Geological Survey has tested the temperature, chemistry and volume of water available. The scheme could eventually heat 1,000 homes and help cut energy bills in Wales' fifth most deprived ward.

2018-01-19

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