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As part of its 70th celebrations, the Geological Survey Northern Ireland is holding a symposium in W5, Belfast, to showcase its achievements over the decades and its commitment to public service.

2017-12-30


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Dr Holly Miller from the University of Nottingham and the British Geological Survey was involved in the detailed macroscopic and chemical analysis of the teeth, bones and tail hair, which reveal the stresses and strains of captive life and provide insights into how Jumbo might have died. She performed the laboratory work with Dr Angela Lamb from the British Geological Survey as part of CEG, and spent a day filming with Sir David Attenborough in Keyworth.

2017-12-07


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As tremors continue in the Aegean, the British Geological Survey’s Debbie Rayner recounts her experience of a magnitude 6.6 earthquake which struck during a family holiday on Kos earlier this year…

2017-11-28


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The Minister of Mines and Steel Development, Dr. Kayode Fayemi, receiving some legacy geological records at the British Geological Survey in Keyworth, Nottingham, UK on Tuesday.

2017-11-28


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The Mahavir Cancer Sansthan & Research Centre has bagged an international project on arsenic remediation. The hospital would be part of an international project on remediation of groundwater arsenic in Ganga river basin, which would be jointly funded by the Natural Environment Research Council,(one of the leading funds provider for independent research on environmental issues) and Union ministry of science and technology.

2017-11-24


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Researchers studying a rapid global warming event 56 million years ago have shown evidence of major changes in the intensity of rainfall and flood events, indicating likely implications should trends of rising carbon dioxide continue. Professor Melanie Leng of the British Geological Survey is concerned about what this represents for the future, "Global warming causes major changes in patterns and intensity of rainfall. These changes are so large we see evidence of them in the geological record."

2017-11-20


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An earthquake on the Iran-Iraq frontier killed at least 400 and injured more than 4000 in the region. Seismologists say the magnitude-7.3 quake could well be followed by at least one more large shock. “The general rule of thumb is that the final aftershock will be one magnitude less,” says seismologist Roger Musson at the British Geological Survey.

2017-11-13


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Huge quantities of nitrate chemicals from farm fertilisers are polluting the rocks beneath our feet, a study says. Researchers at the British Geological Survey say it could have severe global-scale consequences for rivers, water supplies, human health and the economy. Matthew Ascott, hydrogeologist at the BGS and lead author, said: "With big investments being made to reduce water pollution through changes in farming, it is vital that we understand what pollution is already in the environment".

2017-11-10


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Shetland's wild, rugged landscape has long fascinated scientists, but for one British Geological Survey (BGS) marine geologist, it's the seabed around the islands that have ignited his interest.

2017-11-06


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A MISSING puzzle piece believed to link humanity and fish discovered in the Scottish Borders is coming home. The Burnmouth fossil, whose analysis was backed with funding from the Natural Environment Research Council, is just one of many important fossils discovered in the Scottish Borders. And later this month the remains of Tiny will be on display in Edinburgh. David Millward, geologist at the British Geological Survey, believes every specimen helps to paint a fuller picture of human evolution.

2017-11-03


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Humans were creating astonishing cave paintings in the Caribbean thousands of years before the arrival of Christopher Columbus, reveals new research. New research – by academics from Leicester University and the British Museum working with colleagues from the British Geological Survey and Cambridge University, – reveals key discoveries including how the rock-art was made and paint recipes.

2017-10-30


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Scientists are now able to date the end of the last ice age in Scotland with a greater degree of certainty than ever before, thanks to new research. Britice-Chrono is a five-year project funded by the Natural Environment Research Council. Partners include the British Geological Survey (BGS), Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre and British Antarctic Survey. Samples were collected using BGS’s hi-tech Vibrocorer.

2017-10-26


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The remains of the small creature called Tiny were found in the Scottish Borders. 360-345 million years ago, Scotland lay close to the Equator and its land was hot. Researcher say Tiny was one of the first four-legged creatures to move onto land. The findings fills in a 15-million year fossil gap when fish transitioned to land life. David Millward, a geologist at NERC's British Geological Survey, said: 'Every specimen tells us something new.'

2017-10-24


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A team of scientists matched stone in statues and religious icons to a quarry in the French Alps, reconstructing a medieval European art trade route. Jane A. Evans, an isotope geochemist from the British Geological Survey called the paper “well-constructed” and said the technique “could be extended to look at a wider range of carvings from differing periods, and they could extend their fingerprinting methods to incorporate other isotope and geochemical methods.”

2017-10-23


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New guidance to safeguard and manage Northern Ireland’s rocks and landscape has been produced by the Geological Survey of Northern Ireland (GSNI). Dr Kirstin Lemon, Team Leader of Information and Infrastructure at the GSNI tells us: “Understanding and managing Northern Ireland’s geodiversity has never been so important. With increasing pressures on our resources and our environment, we need to provide guidance on how we can safeguard and manage this for current and future generations.”

2017-10-23


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The British Geological Survey (BGS) is the world’s oldest national survey and the premier centre in the UK for earth science expertise. Executive Director Professor John Ludden is dedicated to advising government and industry on how to face geological challenges. We caught up with him at to discuss the BGS’s focus of understanding earth and environmental processes as well as delivering impartial advice in all areas of geoscience in the UK and internationally.

2017-10-20


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The scale of human impact on our planet has changed the course of Earth's history, an international team of researchers has concluded. Dr Colin Waters, a researcher with the British Geological Survey and the chair of The Anthropocene Working Group said: 'The Anthropocene Working Group is now working on such a proposal, based upon finding a 'golden spike' - a reference level within recent strata somewhere in the world that will best characterize the changes of the Anthropocene.

2017-10-02


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SIR Keith O’Nions has been announced as the first chair to lead the new British Geological Survey (BGS) board, which has been created to assist the BGS meet future challenges and ensure it continues as a globally leading survey, delivering services and providing infrastructure support both nationally and globally.

2017-09-29


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The recently launched Horizon 2020 project SERA (Seismology and Earthquake Engineering Research Infrastructure Alliance for Europe) aims to reduce the risk posed by natural and anthropogenic earthquakes across Europe. As part of this effort, a comprehensive earthquake risk modelling framework for Europe is being developed by a core group of engineering / risk partners in collaboration with the Global Earthquake Model or GEM.

2017-09-29


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THE British Geological Survey (BGS) has announced the location for a new “observatory for the underground” near Frodsham and Helsby that will provide important research evidence on natural resources for heat and energy. BGS has confirmed the Ince Marshes area as its preferred location for the Cheshire Energy Research Field Site, part of a £31 million science investment.

2017-09-26

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