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Project Details

The project started in January 2001, will run for 36 months, has a budget of approximately ~ 3.3 million and is co-funded through the EC Fifth Framework Programme, Energy Sub-Programme http://www.cordis.lu/eesd/home.html

The British Geological Survey (BGS) instigated the project and is project co-ordinator. There are 10 other partners involved in the project:

The NASCENT team

The NASCENT team at their first meeting in February 2001 at the British Geological Survey offices in Keyworth, Nottingham, UK.

Preservation of the environment and natural resources. This is the main thrust of NASCENT. By studying natural CO2 accumulations as analogues for disposal, several very important issues, for which the EU is directly and indirectly responsible, can be addressed. For large-scale sequestration to take place the public will need confidence in their safety and that the environment is being adequately protected. This will be especially true since many storage sites will be onshore. NASCENT will specifically and directly answer questions such as:

  • Can potable groundwater resources be protected during and after disposal?
A resident of Matraderescke village providing samples of mineral water to the NASCENT team.

A resident of Matraderescke village providing samples of mineral water to the NASCENT team. This drinking water is sold locally and is naturally carbonated.

  • Will the CO2 remain where it is put and if it doesn't where will it go, how will it get there, how quickly and how much?
Natural CO2 bubbles being emitted from a fracture in the bed of a stream.

Natural CO2 bubbles being emitted from a fracture in the bed of a stream, near the village of Matraderescke, northern Hungary.

  • What effects would CO2 leaking from a repository have on the environment?
A tree killed by high natural CO2 concentrations.

A tree killed by high natural CO2 concentrations in the soil in northern Hungary.

  • Will disposal increase the risk of seismic activity and ground heave?


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