Report a landslide to the BGS landslides team

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Please click on the diagram that closest resembles the landslide to fill in the below

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E.g. newspaper article, website

If yes, please email them to landslides@bgs.ac.uk.

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Types of landslides diagram


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Types of landslide

Falls

Rock fall

Masses are detached from steep slope/cliff along surfaces with little or no shear displacement (e.g. joints/fissures) and descend mostly through air by free fall, bouncing or rolling. Material appears mainly as large rock fragments, boulders.

Debris fall

Masses are detached from steep slope/cliff along surfaces with little or no shear displacement (e.g. joints/fissures) and descend mostly through air by free fall, bouncing or rolling. Material appears mainly as stones, cobbles, gravel.

Earth fall

Masses are detached from steep slope/cliff along surfaces with little or no shear displacement (e.g. joints/fissures) and descend mostly through air by free fall, bouncing or rolling. Material appears mainly as mud.

Topples

Rock topple

Movement by forward rotation about a pivot point. Material appears mainly as large rock fragments, boulders.

Debris topple

Movement by forward rotation about a pivot point. Material appears mainly as stones, cobbles, gravel.

Earth topple

Movement by forward rotation about a pivot point. Material appears mainly as mud.

Rotational Slide

Rotational rock slide

Rotational slides (slumps): masses slide outwards and downwards on one or more concave-upward failure surfaces that impart a backward tilt to the slipping mass, which sinks at the rear and heaves at the toe. Material appears mainly as large rock fragments, boulders.

Rotational debris slide

Rotational slides (slumps): masses slide outwards and downwards on one or more concave-upward failure surfaces that impart a backward tilt to the slipping mass, which sinks at the rear and heaves at the toe. Material appears mainly as stones, cobbles, gravel.

Rotational earth slide

Rotational slides (slumps): masses slide outwards and downwards on one or more concave-upward failure surfaces that impart a backward tilt to the slipping mass, which sinks at the rear and heaves at the toe. Material appears mainly as mud.

Translational slide

Translational rock slide

Translational (planar) slides: movements occur along planar failure surfaces that may run more-or less parallel to the slope. Material appears mainly as large rock fragments, boulders.

Translational debris slide

Translational (planar) slides: movements occur along planar failure surfaces that may run more-or less parallel to the slope. Material appears mainly as stones, cobbles, gravel.

Translational earth slide

Translational (planar) slides: movements occur along planar failure surfaces that may run more-or less parallel to the slope. Material appears mainly as mud.

Spreads

Rock/Debris spread

Spreads involve the fracturing and lateral extension of coherent rock or soil masses due to plastic flow or liquefaction of subjacent material. Material appears mainly as large rock fragments, boulders, stones, cobbles, gravel.

Earth spread

Spreads involve the fracturing and lateral extension of coherent rock or soil masses due to plastic flow or liquefaction of subjacent material. Material appears mainly as mud.

Flow

Rock flow

Slow to rapid movements of saturated or dry materials which advance by flowing like a viscous fluid, usually following an initial sliding movement. Some flows may be bounded by basal and marginal shear surfaces but dominant movement of the displaced material is by flowage. Material appears mainly as large rock fragments, boulders.

Debris flow

Slow to rapid movements of saturated or dry materials which advance by flowing like a viscous fluid, usually following an initial sliding movement. Some flows may be bounded by basal and marginal shear surfaces but dominant movement of the displaced material is by flowage. Material appears mainly as stones, cobbles, gravel.

Earth flow

Slow to rapid movements of saturated or dry materials which advance by flowing like a viscous fluid, usually following an initial sliding movement. Some flows may be bounded by basal and marginal shear surfaces but dominant movement of the displaced material is by flowage. Material appears mainly as mud.

Complex

Complex

Complex slides: involve a type of movement style that combines two or more of the main movement types (fall, topple, slide, spread, flow) occurring in sequence. Complexity may be indicated by combining the main movement terms, e.g. complex rotational earth slide-earth flow (or complex slump-earth flow).

Debris flow Complex Earth flow Soilfluction flows Earth spread Debris spread Translational earth slide Translational debris slide Translational rock slide Successive rotational slides Multiple rotational slide Single rotational slide Earth topple Debris topple Rock topple Earth fall Debris fall Rock fall