ICDP-UK News

2017

November

1) ICDP workshop on drilling Lake Nam Co, Tibetian Plateau: 22–24 May 2018 (Beijing, China). A continuous, high–resolution, record for these long time scales from Nam Co can be recovered by drilling to study sediment budget changes under varying climatic and tectonic settings, and contribute to a better understanding of the Quaternary geomagnetic field. Members of the international scientific community interested in the planning of and participating in the research project, are invited to apply for participation in the workshop. It will be held in Beijing, China, from 22–24 May 2018 to further develop the project's scientific goals and to discuss technical and logistic issues for a full proposal to ICDP. Interested parties are requested to submit their application by 15 January 2018 to Torsten Haberzettl (torsten.haberzettl@uni-jena.de) and Liping Zhu (lpzhu@itpcas.ac.cn) with contact details, a summary of research interests and expertise, and a brief description of the intended project contribution.

More information

2) SAG meeting: March 26–28, 2018 in Grand Junction, USA; EC & AOG: May 29 – June 03, 2018 in Guilin, China.

For more information about the ICDP steering groups/panels.

October

1) Dr Lizzie Garratt, NERC Head of Earth & Energy Science, has taken over as the UK representative on the ICDP Assembly of Governors, replacing Prof John Ludden(BGS). Thanks to John for his contribution to ICDP–UK over the last 5 years.

2) The online application form has now re-opened for OmanDP Phase 2 (https://www.omandrilling.ac.uk/application-form). Please note that if you have already applied previously you do not need apply again.The deadline for applications to participate in Phase 2 drill site activities is 17:00 BST Friday 13th October 2017. Please note that we will start staffing the November slots as soon as we receive applications and therefore people who are keen to join at the start should submit their applications asap. Remember that all science party members (those who participate in Phase 2 drill site and/or logging operations) will be eligible to make sample requests within the Phase 2 moratorium period (see the OmanDP Sampling Policy).

3) The ICDP Best Practice Brochure (Primer) – the 3rd Edition of the ICDP Primer (published 09/2017) is now online.

September

1) ICDP science at the GSA annual meeting, October 22–25 2017, Seattle USA T96. Understanding African Environmental History through Continental Scientific Drilling: Past Successes and Future Opportunities This session will discuss results from recent and planned continental scientific drilling projects in Africa, with a focus on understanding the evolution of African climate, environments, and sedimentary systems during the Neogene. P3. IODP–ICDP Expedition 364 to the Chicxulub Impact Crater Sixty–five million years ago, the evolution of Earth was dramatically altered by the Chicxulub impact event. This icon of the impact–mass extinction hypothesis was targeted by IODP–ICDP Expedition 364 to test models of peak–ring formation, impact–generated hydrothermal systems, habitability within those systems, and the recovery of life in the vicinity of the crater. This Pardee Keynote Symposium will reveal first–year studies of a borehole that pierced the PETM, the Paleogene sediments that cover the crater, impact–melt bearing units on the floor of the crater, and the granitic core of a peak-ring that was uplifted ~10 km in a geologic instant.

2) IDDP-2 Video

Check the recently published video on IDDP-2 from the Iceland Deep Drilling Project.

3) ICDP panel dates SAG meeting: March 26–28, 2018 in Grand Junction, USA;EC & AOG: May 29 – June 03, 2018 in Guilin, China.

For more information about the ICDP steering groups/panels.

July

1) The Operational Support Group at the Center for Scientific Drilling, a section of the GFZ Potsdam, Germany, is inviting applications for a Research Scientist in the role of a Staff Scientist for scientific ICDP drilling projects.

More information

Many thanks, Ronald Conze (Scientific Drilling – ICDP/OSG).

June

1) Update on UK ICDP membership...
As most of you know, BGS has paid the ICDP membership fee on behalf of UK ICDP since 2012. The intention in doing this was to demonstrate that breadth and quality of interest in ICDP facilitated science in the UK. The results on drilling proposals, workshop activities and also co-funding from NERC science grants speak for themselves and UK scientists have rapidly taken a leading position in ICDP.

NERC have agreed to fund the ICDP membership fee through 2018 and provide time for NERC to renegotiate with ICDP on continued membership.

BGS will continue to support Melanie Leng (ICDP Executive Committee) and Kathryn Goodenough (Chair of the ICDP Science Advisory Group) in their ICDP-related activities and will provide support for UK-ICDP secretariat. John Ludden will step down at the UK’s representative on the Assembly of Governors – and his position will be replaced by NERC (Beth House/Lizzie Garratt) with immediate effect. BGS will work with GFZ on operational aspects of drilling and will also be championing some projects that fit closely with BGS strategy.

2) Geoblog about the latest ICDP Executive Committee in Kiruna...
In early June each year the International Continental scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) committee meets to assess applications for drilling deep holes in the Earth. This year the meeting was held in Kiruna in northern Sweden. Here Melanie Leng explains a bit about ICDP, the UK’s geoscience ICDP community, and her trip to Kiruna as the UK’s representative on the ICDP Executive Committee...

More information

3) Open call to apply for the ICDP 2017 Training Course on Continental Scientific Drilling – deadline for application is August 18, 2017
The training course will be held from November 5–10, 2017 either at Caernarfon (UK) nearby the ICDP–sponsored JET drilling project or at the Geocenter KTB in Windischeschenbach (Germany) and is recommended for PhD students, post–docs and scientists involved in scientific drilling. For the successful candidates, expenses for travel, visa, meals and accommodation will be covered by ICDP.

Check the ICDP website for more details (http://www.icdp-online.org/).

Applications should include a letter of interest, CV, and at least two letters of support. Please send your application by August 18 to icdp-outreach@gfz-potsdam.de

April

1) Dear colleagues and friends of ICDP attending the EGU General Assembly 2017 in Vienna,You are cordially invited to join the ICDP–IODP Townhall Meeting on Scientific Drilling on Tuesday, April 25, Room G2, 19:00–20:00. ICDP and IODP scientists and program representatives will provide brief updates on current projects and future key research topics. These updates will be followed by an opportunity to get together over refreshments. We furthermore invite you to take part on the joint IODP–ICDP Session: Achievements and perspectives in scientific ocean and continental drilling (SSP1.3), Room 1.85, Thursday, April 27, 13:30–15:00 and 15:30–17:00, Poster attendance: Thursday, April 27, 17:30–19:00. Please take also the opportunity to meet and discuss with us at the IODP/ECORD-ICDP booth #60–63 in the Entrance Hall. We are looking forward meeting you in Vienna! Best regards,Thomas Wiersberg

March

1) Congratulations to a team from the UK (headed by Prof Phil Barker) on a successful NERC Standard Grant as part of DeepCHALLA entitled: Climate change in equatorial Africa: testing the 'megadrought' hypothesis and its implications for human evolution. The project hypothesis is that high orbital eccentricity during the period 130-90 ka BP amplified the 23 ka, precessional insolation changes, and was linked with catastrophic monsoon failure lasting several millennia. Integrated dating methods will be used to produce the first truly high-precision, accurately-dated palaeoenvironmental archive spanning the entirety of these MIS5 African 'mega-droughts'. The project team will reconstruct hydrological conditions over the last 250 ka, using state-of-the-art stable isotope analyses as tracers of drought. Results will facilitate palaeo-hydrological and -climate modelling, generating a step change in our understanding of the causes and nature of these extreme hydrological events, which may have played a major role in the evolution of many species, including humans.

2) Oman Drilling Project update for UK-ICDP
The Oman Drilling Project is an international collaborative project part-funded by the ICDP that will use drill cores to explore the processes that both create and modify the ocean crust and shallow mantle exposed in the Oman ophiolite. Over two phases (December 2016 – March 2017 and October 2017 – March 2018) a series of boreholes from six sites have or will be cored. Rotary drilling will also be undertaken at three sites to facilitate geophysical logging and microbiological and hydrogeological testing. Each drilling phase will be followed by detailed characterisation of cores in the subsequent summer, beginning with Phase 1 cores in July 2017 on board the drilling vessel Chikyu, as part of a collaboration between ICDP and IODP. Phase 1 operations are going extremely well, with 100% core recovery in the three 400 m boreholes in the lower crustal gabbros currently completed. One further borehole is currently being cored at the basal thrust between serpentinised peridotite and the underlying metasediments and metabasalts of the metamorphic sole. Two 400 m rotary boreholes have also been completed during Phase 1 operations. UK scientists from the University of Southampton, Plymouth University and Cardiff University have played crucial roles in the international onsite science team responsible for the initial core curation, imaging and description prior to the cores being shipped to the Chikyu for full description. Applications to participate in Phase 1 core characterisation and Phase 2 activities should be made via the project website. Phase 1 core description on the Chikyu will take place from 15th July to 15th September 2017 (deadline for applications 1st May 2017). Participants will join for one month, with science staff handover on 15th August 2017. Further information about the project can be found at http://www.omandrilling.ac.uk/ and daily updates and photos are being shared via the project twitter and Facebook pages.

A PhD project based on the lower crustal gabbroic cores with Dr Michelle Harris at Plymouth University is currently being advertised, the deadline for applications is April 30th. More details on the project are available here: https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/student-life/your-studies/the-graduate-school/postgraduate-research-studentships/deciphering-the-signature-of-fluidrock-reaction-in-the-lower-oceanic-crust-the-oman-ophiolite-analogue

January

1) The ICDP Annual Report 2016 is now online:
http://www.icdp–online.org/.../Annual_ICDP_Report_2016_web.pdf

2) A change in the ICDP Executive Committee Chairman. After six successful years as Chairman of the ICDP Executive Committee, Prof Brian Horsfield will be handing over his position to Prof Axel Liebscher, Head of Section on Geological Storage at GFZ, with effect from April 2017.

2016

December

1) A PhD project using the Oman Drilling Project drill cores is currently being advertised by the University of Southampton with Juerg Matter & Damon Teagle.

2) Don't forget... ICDP accepts proposals of all kinds up to January 15 each year. All proposals will be reviewed by the Science Advisory Group in early spring. Workshop proposals will be decided on by the Executive Committee in early summer, while Full Proposals will be decided on by the Assembly of Governors shortly after the EC meeting.

More information

3) MagellanPlus Workshop at Campi Flegrei. Development of an IODP Drilling Proposal at Campi Flegrei linking to ICDP Drilling. February 25–28, 2017, San Domenico Maggiore Convent, Naples, Italy.

More information

4) Scientific Exploration of Induced SeisMicity and Stress (SEISMS). ICDP–SCEC workshop, March 29–31, 2017, at Lamont–Doherty Earth Observatory, USA.

Read more... The workshop will focus on the types of earthquake science questions that could be addressed with fault zone boreholes in and around active faults, and will evaluate different strategies for making direct observations of earthquake rupture in the subsurface. To apply to the workshop, send a 2 page CV and a single page statement of interest to seisms@ldeo.columbia.edu. The statement should include your interest in the project and a summary of your expertise. The deadline for travel support application is January 6, 2017.

5) The Oman Drilling Project is underway, with the first drill site science team assembling, check out their Facebook page

October

Biogeosciences

1) The Biogeosciences second special issue of papers from the SCOPSCO project is now online: "Integrated perspectives on biological and geological dynamics in ancient Lake Ohrid". This volume contains 5 papers with UK authors. Editor(s): B. Wagner, T. Wilke, F. Wagner-Cremer, and J. Middelburg


2) ICDP has a Facebook page: Any news from the UK can be uploaded as a Visitor Post or send content to Melanie Leng who is an administrator.

3) ICDP blog: Linking Geology & Biology in Europe's oldest lake: a 1.3 million–year record of climate change and evolution from Lake Ohrid... by Jack Lacey and Melanie Leng

The Lake Ohrid drilling project has featured regularly on the BGS blog site (Geoblog) over past years, now reaching its final stages Jack Lacey and Melanie Leng travelled to the Netherlands to attend the 6th project workshop in Utrecht. Here they report on the meeting and provide a much overdue update on this ground-breaking interdisciplinary research...

4) Update on the Chicxulub crater project by Prof Joanne Morgan

The UK project lead is Prof Joanna Morgan (Imperial College London) aimed to drill the Chicxulub crater's peak ring – a ring of hills within the impact basin to understand peakact climate, investigate the recovery of life in a sterile zone, examine whether impact craters could have been habitats for ring and large crater formation, the rock weakening mechanism that leads to flat final craters, constrain the post–imp early life, and study an atypical PETM. The drilling was successful and the cores collected include 120 m of limestone sediments deposited between 65.5 million years ago to around 50 million years ago, as well as some 120 m of broken and melted rocks burying a ring of mountains (the peak ring) that surround the center of the crater. There is abundant evidence that a vigorous hydrothermal system existed in the wake of the impact with fluids flowing through the broken and melted rocks that cover the peak ring. The team has also found that microbial life found a foothold in the crater likely taking advantage of the chemistry and porous nature of the broken and melted rocks. Sediments that bury the crater, which were recovered in the Expedition 364 cores, include the critical time intervals when marine life made a recovery at ground zero where ocean conditions may have been toxic for an extended period of time after the impact.

For more information please contact Joanne Morgan.

5) Update on the ICDP Workshop on Deep Drilling of Lake Chad.

Seven UK-based scientists attended the ICDP workshop aimed at preparing a full drilling proposal to recover a 10Ma climate record from Lake Chad. The workshop was held on 21–23 September in Aix–en–Provence in France and brought together an international group including some key governmental and research players from Chad. Discussions focussed on the importance of this unique north African monsoon record as well as the logistical challenges posed by drilling in Chad. The meeting participants agreed to work together to submit a full drilling proposal to ICDP in January 2017 under the leadership of Florence Sylvestre (CEREGE). The large UK team which comprises Simon Armitage (Royal Holloway), Charlie Bristow (Birkbeck), Leon Clarke (MMU), Rachel Flecker (Bristol), Jonathan Holmes (UCL), Ulrich Salzmann (Northumbria) and Ben Tutolo (Oxford) will contribute substantially to all aspects of the drilling and subsequent science.

For more details please contact Rachel Flecker.

August

1) Congratulations to the following UK researchers who have been selected to attend the ICDP Workshop on Deep Drilling of Lake Chad which will take place 21st–23rd September in Aix–en–Provence: Jonathan Holmes (UCL), Charlie Bristow (Birkbeck), Rachel Flecker (Bristol), Simon Armitage (Royal Holloway), Leon Clarke (Manchester Metropolitan), and Benjamin Tutolo (Oxford).

July

1) Congratulations to the following UK researchers who have been selected for the 2016 ICDP "Training Course on Continental Scientific Drilling" to be held in October 2016 at the GFZ Potsdam: Alex Hudson (Imperial College London, University of Exeter), Bartosz Karykowski (Cardiff University), Clemens Ullmann (University of Exeter), Jack Lacey (BGS), Marisa Storm (University of Oxford).

June

1) A blog by Melanie Leng on the recent ICDP executive committee meeting: Continental Drilling and South Korea

2) Dr Rachel Flecker (Bristol), Dr Mike Rogerson (Hull), Dr Javier Hernandez–Molina (Royal Holloway) and Dr Grant Bigg (Sheffield) are the UK members of an amphibious drilling proposal, IMMAGE (Investigating Miocene Mediterranean–Atlantic Gateway Exchange). ICDP has agreed to fund a workshop to develop the full ICDP–IODP proposal. The date of the workshop has yet to be confirmed but it will be held in Morocco probably towards the end of 2016.

For more details please contact Rachel Flecker.

May

1) Some news on the Joint IODP-ICDP drilling of the Chicxulub impact crater, expedition 364, by Jo Morgan.

The expedition kicked off on 5th April 2016 when members of the ECORD Science Operator (ESO), sailed from Progreso on the Liftboat L/B Myrtle, with the ship’s crew, DOSECC drillers, Barcroft film crew, and offshore science party. The liftboat was jacked up in 19 m deep water, and commenced drilling towards the crater's peak ring – a ring of hills within the impact basin several hundred meters beneath the sea–bottom. The first scientific target was the PETM, which was considered to be deeper than 550 m, hence, open–hole drilling without coring was conducted to 500 m depth. For the rest of the hole, core was recovered using mining drilling technology, and core recovery was close to 100%. The top of the peak ring was encountered at ~618 m and several hundred meters of peak–ring rocks were recovered, with the hole terminating at 1334.7 m depth on 25th May.

The peak ring was found to be formed from granitic basement rocks covered by ~130 meters of impactites. A suite of wireline logs and vertical seismic profile (VSP) data were acquired in three separate runs, between the total depth and surface.

The expedition received a lot of media interest, further information will be available soon, or contact Jo Morgan (j.v.morgan@imperial.ac.uk).

April

1) Note the following ICDP calls for participation:

ICDP Workshop on Deep Drilling of Lake Chad (September 21st–23rd 2016 in Aix–en–Provence, France).
ICDP Training Course on Continental Scientific Drilling (October 16th–20th 2016 at the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam, Germany).

For more information please contact Dr Thomas Wiersberg

EGU logo

2) For those attending the EGU General Assembly 2016 in Vienna, you are cordially invited to the:

3) "Confessions (blogs) of a Newbie Drill Coordinator" by Jez Everest (BGS) regarding the Chicxulub crater drilling project.
Week 1, week , week 3.


3) "Confessions (blogs) of a Newbie Drill Coordinator" by Jez Everest (BGS) regarding the Chicxulub crater drilling project.

Week 1, week 2, week 3


4) Funding success! NERC have funded a Large Grant application worth £3.7M to support an ICDP project on the Lower Jurassic in Wales/UK: Integrated understanding of the early Jurassic Earth system and Timescale (JET). The overall PI is Stephen Hesselbo (University of Exeter) with UK Co-Is from Oxford, the BGS and Leeds.

Jurassic cadomities

The science objectives are to:

This project has also received US$1.5M from ICDP towards the drilling.


March

Chicxulub crater

1) Read all about the IODP/ICDP funded project to drill into the Chicxulub crater:

Scientists gear up to drill into 'ground zero' of the impact that killed the dinosaurs in Science. The UK project lead is Prof Joanna Morgan (Imperial College London) and the aims are to drill a single 1500-m hole through the crater's peak ring – a ring of hills within the impact basin to understand peak ring and large crater formation, the rock weakening mechanism that leads to flat final craters, constrain the post-impact climate, investigate the recovery of life in a sterile zone, examine whether impact craters could have been habitats for early life, and study an atypical PETM. David Smith from the BGS is part of the technical drilling team.

2) More media attention of the Chicxulub crater drilling project: Searching for life after the mass extinction

Read more in the Mail Online

3) New super-eruption discovery from the Yellowstone hotspot

Dr Tom Knott, Dr Marc Reichow and Prof Mike Branney from the University of Leicester with their international collaborators, have just reported the discovery of a new super-eruption from the ICDP funded Yellowstone Hotspot project. The group estimate the eruption volume to have exceeded 1,900 km3. The single ignimbrite covers 14,000 km2 of Idaho, and is more than 1.3 km thick in the caldera of the supervolcano. It is just one of 12 giant eruptions reported from the area by the team, who show that intense hotspot magmatism caused major crustal subsidence, forming the 100 km-wide Snake River Basin. You can find out more about the new super-eruption in their paper just out in the Geological Society of America Bulletin.

February

1) An update of the HSPDP project has been published in the most recent issue of Scientific Drilling: Cohen, A, Campisano, C, Arrowsmith, R, Asrat, A, Behrensmeyer, A K, Deino, A, Feibel, C, Hill, A, Johnson, R, Kingson, J, Lamb, H, Lowenstein, T, Noren, A, Olago, D, Owen, R B, Potts, R, Reed, K, Renaut, R, Schäbitz, F, Tiercelin, J–J, Trauth, M H, Wynn, J, Ivory, S, Brady, K, O’Grady, R, Rodysill, J, Githiri, J, Russell, J, Foerster, V, Dommain, R, Rucina, S, Deocampo, D, Russell, J, Billingsley, A, Beck, C, Dorenbeck, G, Dullo, L, Feary, D, Garello, D, Gromig, R, Johnson, T, Junginger, A, Karanja, M, Kimburi, E, Mbuthia, A, McCartney, T, McNulty, E, Muiruri, V, Nambiro, E, Negash, E W, Njagi, D, Wilson, J N, Rabideaux, N, Raub, T, Sier, M J, Smith, P, Urban, J, Warren, M, Yadeta, M, Yost, C, Zinaye, B. 2016. The Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project: Inferring the Environmental Context of Human Evolution from Eastern African Rift Lake Deposits. Scientific Drilling 21, 1–16 doi:10.5194/sd–21–1–2016

2015

December

1) The International Continental Scientific Drilling Program cordially invites you to the joint IODP/ICDP Town Hall Meeting on Tuesday, December 15, 6:30 PM at the Metropolitan Ballroom, JW Marriott, San Francisco, Union Square, 515 Mason Street. Meet IODP and ICDP representatives for program updates and future developments. A great opportunity to network with your colleagues over refreshments. Please join us also at the ECORD/IODP–ICDP booth #313.

2) A new ground-breaking drilling project gets the go-ahead. This multinational project involves a large international team of engineers and researchers, including several groups from the UK. The ICDP will provide up to $1M funding to retrieve the first core from an active magma chamber in Iceland. The project is the KMDP (Krafla Magma Drilling Project).

The unexpected discovery of a rhyolite magma body only 2.1 km below the Krafla Caldera has opened a window of opportunity for studies leading to fundamental advances in geothermal energy production and assessment of volcanic hazards. This project will piggyback on the drilling of a new geothermal well, which will be deepened with ICDP funds to provide the World's first controlled sampling of an active magma chamber. Drilling will include sampling overlying hydrothermally-altered rocks including the subcritical-supercritical transition, the rock-magma interface, and parly-crystalised magma itself. Drilling into the beating heart of a live volcano and will push drilling technology to its limits, and provide a great leap forward in our ability to sample hitherto inaccessible parts of the geosphere. ICDP-funded activities will form part of a larger collaboration with the ultimate aim of a long-term International Volcanic Geothermal Testbed.

Scientific and engineering objectives relate to development of next-generation supercritical geothermal energy production, and a far deeper understanding of complex magma bodies within calderas:

The project PI is John Eichelberger (University of Alaska) and the UK steering committee member is Sue Loughlin (British Geological Survey).

Over 25 organisations are involved in the development of the KMDP, with UK interests being represented by researchers from: the British Geological Survey, the University of Lancaster, the University of Liverpool, and the University of Manchester.

3) The following were presented at AGU 2015:

October

1) New UK-led drilling project gets the green light. ICDP have provided US$ 1M funding for a new drilling project on the Paleogene marine record from coastal Tanzania, project TOPIC (Tanzania Onshore Paleogene Integrated Coring).

The project will provide a new integrated stratigraphy for the Tanzanian Paleogene which is well known for its excquisite microfossil preservation and palaeoclimate records. Drilling will include new records through the Paleocene/Eocene and Eocene/Oligocene boundaries, and everything in between. Scientific objectives relate to paleoclimate studies and the deep subsurface biosphere:

The project PI is Paul Pearson (Cardiff University) with other UK Co-Is from UCL, Birmingham, Southampton, BGS, and Bristol.

2) Congratulations to the following (UK) applications to the "ICDP Managing and Execution of Continental Scientific Drilling Projects" training to be run at KTB GeoCentre in Windischeschenbach, Germany, between 19th–21st October 2015: Maarten Blaauw, Judith Coggon, Stephen Hesselbo, Juerg Matter, Paul Pearson.

3) Melanie Leng attended to 8th ECORD-IODP-ICDP Outreach and Education Task Force Meeting between 5th–7th October 2015 at GFZ, Potsdam, Germany. Please contact Melanie Leng (ICDP) or Alan Stevenson (ECORD) if you would like advice about outreach for ICDP projects.

4) Jon Dean attended the "ICDP Training Course on Lacustrine Sediment Drilling" in September at Lake Ohrid (Macedonia).

September

1) Funding success! The ICDP have provided US$1.5M towards the drilling for a project on the Lower Jurassic in Wales/UK: Integrated understanding of the early Jurassic Earth system and Timescale (JET).

The science objectives are to:

The overall PI is Stephen Hesselbo (University of Exeter) with UK Co-Is from Oxford, the BGS and Leeds

2) Congratulations to the ICDP team for successfully putting together a special issue of International Journal of Earth Sciences (volume 104, issue 6) on "A Snapshot of Research Findings Enabled by Scientific Drilling". All papers are open access.

3) Congratulations to Luca Menegon and Mark Anderson (both Plymouth) for their successful applications to the ICDP Scientific Workshop on the "Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides" project, between 12th-14th October 2015 in Uppsala, Sweden.

4) ICDP-UK Science Showcase

The BGS will be hosting a science showcase of existing and up and coming ICDP co-funded projects on Wednesday 23th September 2015. The speakers and presentation titles are listed below. If you would like to attend please contact Melanie Leng.

ICDP-UK Science Showcase - speakers and presentation titles

   09.30-10.15 Arrival at the BGS, tea & coffee
Prof Melanie Leng 10.15-10.30 Welcome and introduction
Prof Brian Horsfield 10.30-10.45 ICDP over view and opportunities
Prof Stephen Hesselbo 10.45-11.00 Integrated understanding of the early Jurassic Earth system and Timescale (JET)
Prof Philip Barker 11.00-11.15 Drilling of the crater Lake Challa near Mt. Kilimanjaro, Kenya, Tanzania
Dr Dan Condon 11.15-11.30 Geologic Research through Integrated Neoproterozoic Drilling (GRIND)
Prof Melanie Leng 11.30-11.45 Scientific Collaboration On Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid (SCOPSCO)
Prof Charles Cockell 11.45-12.00 Chicxulub Impact Crater
  12.00-13.00 Lunch and general discussion
Prof Henry Lamb 13.00-13.15 Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP) - using scientific drilling to understand the paleoclimate context of human evolution
Dr Mike Rogerson 13.15-13.30 The Lake CHAd Deep DRILLing Project (CHADRILL) - unravelling 10 million years of environmental and climatic changes in Africa
Dr Mike Rogerson 13.30-13.45 Investigating Mediterranean-Atlantic Gateway Exchange (IMAGE)
Prof Paul Pearson 13.45-14.00 Tanzania Onshore Paleogene Integrated Coring (TOPIC) - Eocene paleoclimate stratigraphy and deep biosphere
Dr Juerg Matter 14.00-14.15 Scientific Drilling in the Samail Ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman
Dr Catriona Menzies 14.15-14.30 Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) - Alpine Fault New Zealand
Dr James Riding 14.30-14.45 CONtinuous Coring Of the Cenozoic (CONOSC) - onshore soutern Northe Sea basin
Dr Chris Rochelle 14.45-15.00 Krafla Magma Drilling Project (KMDP)
Dr Nick Roberts 15.00-15.15 Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC): Mountain belt dynamics and present-day impacts
Prof John Ludden,
Dr Mike Patterson,
Prof Brian Horsfield
15.15-16.00 Final discussion, tea & coffee

July

1) Congratulations to Jonathan Dean and Dayton Dove (both BGS) for their successful applications to the ICDP Training Course on Lacustrine Sediment Drilling to be held in September at Lake Ohrid (Macedonia). This training course will cover aspects of scientific drilling in lakes, including project planning and management, pre-site studies, drilling engineering, drill core handling and storage, on-site core analysis, downhole logging, data management, and post-drilling activities.

2) As part of the outreach for the "Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP) - using scientific drilling to understand the paleoclimate context of human evolution" project, Julian Ruddock (artist in residence), has produced a short video of his impressions during a visit to the drilling site in November.

3) The latest volume of Scientific Drilling is now online. The following articles have UK authors:

4) Scientific Workshop: on the "Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides" project. October 12th-14th 2015 in Uppsala, Sweden. Information on workshop objectives and how to apply. Application deadline is August 15.

June

1) ICDP invites Principal Investigators, project managers and leading scientists of upcoming continental scientific drilling projects to apply for the ICDP Training Course on Planning, Management and Execution of Continental Scientific Drilling Projects to be held from October 19-21, 2015, at the GeoZentrum KTB (Germany). This training course will touch upon relevant aspects for managing a scientific drilling project, including:

More information

2) Continental drilling and a trip to Minneapolis... by Melanie Leng

In early June the ICDP committees met to assess deep drilling of the Earth applications for 2015. The meeting was held at the world famous LacCore (National Lacustrine Core Facility) in Minneapolis. Here Melanie Leng explains a bit about ICDP, the UK’s geoscience community involvement, and her trip to Minneapolis...

More information

May

1) The International Continental Scientific Drilling Program, ICDP invites scientists from upcoming scientific drilling projects for lacustrine sediments to apply for the ICDP Training Course on Lacustrine Sediment Drilling to be held from September 14-16, 2015 at Lake Ohrid (Macedonia). This training course will touch upon relevant aspects of scientific drilling in lakes, including project planning and management, pre-site studies, drilling engineering, drill core handling and storage, on-site core analysis, downhole logging, data management, and post-drilling activities. The training course is recommended for master students, doctorate students and post-docs involved in scientific drilling. Deadline for application is June 30, 2015; decisions will be communicated by July 10. Preference will be given to applicants involved in ICDP drilling projects, applicants from ICDP member countries, developing countries, and those from countries considering ICDP membership. For the successful candidates, costs including those for travelling, visa, and accommodation will be covered by the ICDP. Applications should include a letter of interest, CV, and at least two letters of support. Please send your application to icdp-outreach@gfz-potsdam.de
More information on ICDP training.

2) Update on the Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) project. The COSC project, funded by the ICDP and Swedish Deep Drilling Programme, aims to study mountain building processes in a major Palaeozoic orogen, the deep structure of this mountain belt, and the role it plays in the recent to present-day climate, hydrology and sub-surface biology. The COSC project aims to drill two deep drill holes, the first of which was completed last year. COSC-1 began drilling on May 1st 2014, and was completed on August 26th 2014. The full 2500m that was aimed for was drilled successfully, with a remarkable >99.5% recovery. H-size diameter (96mm) was drilled to 1600m, and this was replaced by N-size down to 2500m. The lithologies encountered comprise felsic orthogneiss and paragneiss mostly, with thin amphibolite and pegmatite layers. The aim of the hole was to penetrate from the Lower Seve Nappe into the unit below, however, a great thickness of mylonitic rocks interpreted as the basal thrust were drilled (~500m), but with no marked changed into an underlying nappe. The drillcore was logged on-site, and has been XRF scanned off-site. Other on-site science included mug logging and measurements, thermal conductivity and hydrological measurements of the drillhole, and matrix gas analyses. The core has been moved to a storage facility in Berlin, and the first sampling party was undertaken in February of this year to begin various scientific studies of the core. These will include physical properties, micro-structural measurements, petrology and geochronology. The operational report and paper discussing the COSC-1 drilling will be soon published in the journal Scientific Drilling. Planning of COSC-2 is underway, so please get in touch with Nick Roberts at the BGS (UK Co-I) if you are interested in scientific collaboration.

3) ICDP-UK science show case workshop

The BGS will be hosting a science showcase of existing and up and coming ICDP co-funded projects on Wednesday 23th September 2015. The speakers and presentation titles are listed below. If you would like to attend please contact Melanie Leng.

Prof Stephen Hesselbo

Integrated understanding of the early Jurassic Earth system and Timescale (JET)

Prof Philip Barker

Drilling of the crater Lake Challa near Mt. Kilimanjaro, Kenya, Tanzania

Dr Dan Condon

Geologic Research through Integrated Neoproterozoic Drilling (GRIND)

Prof Melanie Leng

Scientific Collaboration On Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid (SCOPSCO)

Prof Charles Cockell

Chicxulub Impact Crater

Prof Henry Lamb

Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP) - using scientific drilling to understand the paleoclimate context of human evolution

Dr Mike Rogerson

The Lake CHAd Deep DRILLing Project (CHADRILL) - unravelling 10 million years of environmental and climatic changes in Africa

Dr Mike Rogerson

Investigating Mediterranean-Atlantic Gateway Exchange (IMAGE)

Prof Paul Pearson

Tanzania Onshore Paleogene Integrated Coring (TOPIC) - Eocene paleoclimate stratigraphy and deep biosphere

Dr Juerg Matter

Scientific Drilling in the Samail Ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman

Dr Catriona Menzies

Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) - Alpine Fault New Zealand

Dr James Riding

CONtinuous Coring Of the Cenozoic (CONOSC) - onshore soutern Northe Sea basin

Dr Susan Loughlin

Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP) - exploration for supercritical geothermal resources

Dr Nick Roberts

Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC): Mountain belt dynamics and present-day impacts

 

April

Chicx-03A

1) A group of over 30 international scientists participated in a pre-drilling workshop on joint IODP-ICDP drilling of the Chicxulub Impact Crater (Expedition 364) in Mérida, Mexico (30-31 March 2015). The workshop was organised by Jaime Urrutia Fucugauchi (UNAM), Mario Rebolledo Vieyra (CICY), Ligia Pérez Cruz (UNAM) and the two scientists who will lead the offshore drilling expedition, Sean Gulick of the University of Texas in Austin, USA and Joanna Morgan of Imperial College London, UK. A single 1500-m hole will be drilled through the crater’s peak ring – a ring of hills within the impact basin. The objectives are to: understand peak ring and large crater formation, the rock weakening mechanism that leads to flat final craters, constrain the post-impact climate, investigate the recovery of life in a sterile zone, examine whether impact craters could have been habitats for early life, and study an atypical PETM. Drilling will take place between April and June 2016. There is a call for scientists to sail on the expedition (please visit the ECORD website), the closing date is 8th May 2015.

January

1) Congratulations to Dr Sev Kender who has been invited to take part in the IODP MagellanPlus Workshop "Drilling the Cretaceous–Palaeogene tropical South Atlantic" in Newcastle 2-4 February 2015. This meeting will be exploring an IODP proposal aimed at understanding the rifting history of the South Atlantic and the evolution of the oceans including Ocean Anoxic Events.

2)Congratulations to Dr Sev Kender who has been invited to take part in the ICDP workshop "Coring North Sea Cenozoic (CONOSC)" in Utrecht 18-21 March 2015. The meeting will focus on developing a full proposal to core the southern North Sea to reconstruct past climatic change over NW Europe, including Eocene hyperthermals.

Unravelling the workings of planet Earth

3) The ICDP science plan 2015-19: Unravelling the Workings of Planet Earth "We invite you to think about why Earth Science matters, and the often surprising ways in which it affects our lives..."

Tanzania workshop September 2014

4) Decembers issue of Scientific Drilling journal is out, including the workshop report on the TOPIC project (led by Paul Pearson): Pearson, P.N., Hudson, W. 2014. Early Cenozoic tropical climate: report from the Tanzania Onshore Paleogene Integrated Coring (TOPIC) workshop. Scientific Drilling, 18, 13-17.

2014

December

1) ICDP's Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project: coring success at Chew Bahir (S Ethiopia) by Prof H.F.Lamb

Some of the Chew Bahir drilling team

Chew Bahir, formerly known as Lake Stephanie, is the last of the five HSPDP drill sites to be completed. Each site is close to a key fossil hominin location; together, the cores will provide a record of environmental change spanning the last 4 million years of human evolution. Coring at Chew Bahir was completed in late November, reaching a final depth of 278.58 m, with a duplicate core to 266.38 m. Drilling ceased following breakage and loss of 32 drilling rods, including the crucial drill bits. Based on sediment accumulation rates of 0.2 - 0.7mm / yr in short pilot cores, the age achieved from these long cores may be 1.4 Ma - 400 ka. All credit for this success must go to our colleagues, especially Frank Schäbitz, Asfawossen Asrat, Verena Foerster, Annette Junginger, Jonas, Gerrit, and Bahru who worked in arduous conditions in day/night shifts over 5 weeks in the field. The cores are now on their way to the LacCore labs at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, where the team will reconvene in early 2015 to carry out initial core description, logging and sampling. The Chew Bahir Project is funded by ICDP, NERC and NSF. Principal Investigators are Henry Lamb (Aberystwyth), Frank Schäbitz (Cologne), Asfawossen Asrat (Addis Ababa), and Martin Trauth (Potsdam). HSPDP is led by Andy Cohen (Arizona). See https://hspdp.asu.edu/ and https://www.facebook.com/HSPDP

November

1) The ICDP have provided US$430,000 towards the drilling for the MEXIDRILL project. The project will use scientific drilling to recover a lacustrine sedimentary sequence contained in the Lake Chalco basin on the southern outskirts of Mexico City in the Valley of Mexico. These sediments have the potential to provide a >500,000 year record of North American climate—a unique climate archive that could develop into the “type sequence” for paleoclimate studies in the Americas. As well as the climate history of the region, the sediments will provide histories of volcanic and seismic activity and the recent subsidence induced by groundwater extraction directly relevant to millions of people. The overall PI is Erik Brown (Large Lakes Observatory & Department of Geological Sciences, University of Minnesota Duluth) and the UK Co-Is are Victoria Smith (University of Oxford) and Sebastian Watt (University of Birmingham).

Worn drill bit from DFDP-2 (R.Sutherland)

2) The ICDP-funded DFDP2 - Alpine Fault Zone drilling project in New Zealand has reached phase 2. Jamie Coussens (PhD student), Dr Catriona Menzies (PPRF), Dr Carolyn Boulton (PDRF), Michael Allen (PhD student) and Professor Dan Faulkner from the UK are all still onsite (Dr Betty Mariani recently left). Currently they are drilling to reach the target rocks, although monitoring continues on the cuttings and the logging tools are running. The current hole is at 85oC at ~500m. Update on the DFDP2 drilling. There is also a blog page by Rupert Sutherland from GNS.

Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project - HSPDP

3) A blog: Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP) update. Drilling of the Chew Bahir site has recently commenced and to date the drill hole is down to 210m of mainly lake clay deposits. Core recovery is around 85%. Updates through November and December can be found on the HSPDP Facebook site. More information.

Team SCOPSCO

4) A blog: Lake Ohrid project team assemble 569 meters of core, 1.2 million years of history, and a multi-disciplinary international team of scientists: It can only be the ICDP SCOPSCO Lake Ohrid Deep Drilling Project! Last fortnight the project held it's 4th workshop at the University of Hull. Jack Lacey, PhD student in the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry, tells us about the project and reports on the meeting. More information.

5) CONOSC - Coring North Sea Cenozoic workshop

This workshop is to develop a proposal to drill the Cenozoic sediments at two onshore sites in the Netherlands that collectively span most of the Cenozoic in a marginal marine geological setting. The Quaternary and Neogene record will be targeted in the Roer Valley Graben while the Paleogene will be retrieved from sequences in the Northern Part of the Netherlands. It is intended to core the full Cenozoic sequence at both sites, respectively c.1800 m and 1200 m.Science questions include:

  • What is the long-term interaction between sediment accumulation and climate change? Investigate source-sink interrelationships, carbon burial and river development inrelation to changing Cenozoic climate gradients and Alpine tectonics.
  • How does geographic isolation impact ecosystem divergence? Investigate Cenozoic extinctions rates, speciation and migration patterns, and respective impacts on geological timescale calibration in NW Europe.

The ICDP-funded workshop will be held between 18-20th March 2015, in Utrecht, The Netherlands. The aim of the workshop is to narrow down the scientific objectives, to determine the best drilling and sampling techniques, and to extend the group of participating scientists. The workshop will be open to interested scientists from academia and industry. For further details please contact:Timme Donders, Utrecht University: Wim Westerhoff, Geological Survey of the Netherlands - TNO, Stefan Luthi, Delft University of Technology

6) ICDP at AGU 2014

The 2014 AGU Fall Meeting will bring together nearly 24,000 Earth and space scientists, educators, students, and other leaders. Several scientific sessions will report on new findings from ICDP projects. You are kindly invited to visit us at the ECORD-ICDP booth and join us at the ICDP-IODP Town Hall meeting. More information.

October

The Oman Drilling Project will investigate in situ mineral carbonation in peridotite.

1) Oman Drilling Project receives $1.5 million support from ICDP

The Oman Drilling Project (ODP) proposes to drill a number of sites in the Samail Ophiolite Oman, the world's largest, best-exposed, and most-studied sub-aerial block of oceanic crust and upper mantle, and has recently received $1.5 million support from ICDP. This complements $300k from the Sloan Foundation Deep Carbon Observatory. The Oman Drilling Project will address long-standing, unresolved questions regarding melt and solid transport in the mantle beneath oceanic spreading ridges, mass transfer between the oceans and the crust via hydrothermal alteration, and recycling of volatile components in subduction zones. It will also will undertake frontier exploration of subsurface weathering processes in mantle peridotite, natural mechanisms of CO2 uptake from surface waters and the atmosphere via alteration and weathering, and the nature of the subsurface biosphere in peridotite undergoing alteration and weathering.

The Oman Drilling Project is led by Peter Kelemen from Columbia University (USA) together with Juerg Matter and Damon Teagle (both Southampton), and involves an international team of 38 proponents including Chris MacLeod (Cardiff). Other UK-based scientists involved in preliminary workshops or in the proposing of drilling-related science include Phyllis Lam, William Powrie, and Nick Woodman (Southampton), Johan Lissenberg (Cardiff), Kathryn Goodenough, Mike Styles, and John Ludden (BGS), Andy McCaig, Jason Harvey (Leeds), Tony Morris (Plymouth), John Maclennan, Marian Holness and Mike Bickle (Cambridge), and Adrian Boyce (SUERC). This team has pending and planned proposals with NERC to raise necessary support to assist with operations, wire-line logging, borehole sampling and experiments, core descriptions, and sample analysis which will supplement the secured funding and additional proposed support from NSF, European and international sources.

2) Deep Fault Drilling Project borehole DFDP-2 blog

Updates on the currently active Deep Fault Drilling Project can be accessed here.

Krafla Magma Drilling Project (KMDP).

3) Krafla Magma Drilling Project (KMDP) workshop

In mid-September, 50 scientists and geothermal engineers from around the world met at Krafla Volcano, east of Akureyri, Iceland for the Krafla Magma Drilling Project (KMDP) Workshop. The group developed a two-stage plan for KMDP, the goals of which are to understand the conditions of storage and dynamics of magma in shallow crust, test the feasibility of tapping magma directly for geothermal energy, and improve and validate surface geophysical techniques for detecting active and potentially dangerous magma under volcanoes. The first phase will be coring of magma at the bottom of the magma discovery well. After that, Landsvirkjun will use the well to produce electricity, with an anticipated output many times a normal geothermal well. Coring has been done successfully in lava lakes because drilling water chills the molten rock to glass ahead of the advancing drill bit. Surface geophysical measurements will be made during drilling to improve imaging of the underground system. These observations will be extended in space and time through sophisticated modeling of the geothermal reservoir. The second phase will be establishment of an international volcano observatory and magma laboratory with a dedicated scientific borehole to conduct magma experiments. The facility will support onsite research for visiting scientists and field schools for students, as well as develop improved technologies for eruption forecasting and for borehole measurements at extreme conditions. Linkages will be developed to local Icelandic universities and research institutes and internationally through the University of the Arctic (UArctic.org). Because this is a unique site of international significance, providing the first direct access to the magmatic environment of Earth, support will be solicited from national governments and the European Union's Earth Plate Observatory System (EPOS). The project aligns with EPOS's theme of geo-fluids and geo-resources, and is an unexpected successor to the U.S. Department of Energy's Magma Energy Program of more than three decades ago, which experimented with a lava lake in Hawaii but never found magma at depth. The KMDP Workshop was supported by a grant from ICDP to the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) and by Landsvirkjun Power Company (landsvirkjun.com), which hosted the workshop. Participants came from Iceland, Denmark, Italy, Germany, Russia, South Korea, UK, Canada, U.S.A., and New Zealand. UK representation at the meeting was from the British Geological Survey, University of Cambridge, Lancaster University, University of Liverpool, and the Open University.

September

Lake Challa on Mount Kilimanjaro.

1) ICDP funding success to drill Lake Challa on Mount Kilimanjaro to investigate megadroughts

The DeepCHALLA project has secured nearly £0.5 million from the International Continental scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) towards drilling costs in order to conduct an unrivalled suite of state-of-the-art investigations into equatorial climate change using environmental proxies, chronological tools and climate modelling. The objectives are: to collect long cores from Lake Challa (encompassing an estimated 250,000 years); to establish a chronology for the new cores through a range of state of the art techniques; and to better understand climate and ecological change in equatorial East Africa using a variety of methods. A major target is to investigate the existence of so-called ‘megadroughts’; periods of millennial-scale aridity around 100,000 years ago. Such long and intensely dry events in the monsoonal African climate history are an unexpected phenomenon, and their precise timing, origin and extent, have yet to be established. The sensitivity of Lake Challa to climate variability, and the potential to develop an excellent uninterrupted chronology for its sediment record, makes it an ideal site to investigate these megadroughts.

The multi international team of researchers is overall led by Professor Dirk Verschuren (Ghent University, Belgium). The UK team comprise Prof Philip Barker (University of Lancaster), Prof Melanie Leng (BGS/University of Nottingham), Dr Christine Lane (University of Manchester), Dr Maarten Blaauw (Queens University Belfast), Prof Barbara Maher (University of Lancaster), Dr Rob Marchant (University of York) and Dr David Ryves (University of Loughborough).

ICDP - ECORD/IODP were present at EGU April 2014

2) ECORD/IODP/ICDP Education and Outreach task force #6

In September, outreach representatives from ECORD, IODP, ICDP met to discuss combined outreach. Here is Thomas Wiersberg's (from ICDP) presentation which summarises some "scientific drilling" issues. Important points that Thomas discussed include: In 2014 there will be the first ICDP-IODP town hall meeting at AGU; there is a proposal for one committee to assess joint land-ocean (ICDP-IODP) drilling projects; there are 5 workshops planned for continental drilling in the near future; and an overview of outreach associated with active projects. For more details contact Melanie Leng.

August

1) Accelerating Neoproterozoic Research through Scientific Drilling

Following the workshop in March there has been continued discussion on how to develop this broad initiative, including visits to potential target intervals in China. A workshop report will soon be submitted to ICDP and published in Scientific Drilling. Whilst this is a developing effort it is planned to submit a full ICDP proposal along with a coordinated series of national proposals during 2015. Ad hoc workshops are planned for both GSA and AGU meeting this autumn to discuss and develop these proposals. If you are interested in joining the email list please contact Dan Condon to express interest in participating.

2) ICDP workshop: "Coring Paleogene Hemipelagic Sediments", Der-es-Salaam, Tanzania, September 2014

This workshop is to develop proposals to core the Paleogene hemipelagic marine mudstones of southern coastal Tanzania. The primary aim is to investigate tropical climatic and biotic change through much of the Paleogene period by continuous coring and logging of at least one deep ( > 1 km) reference section. Drilling targets include critical intervals of extreme climate and major climate change, including the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum, the early and middle Eocene climatic optima, the middle/late Eocene biotic turnover, the late Eocene impact events, and the Eocene/Oligocene transition and earliest Oligocene glacial maximum. The workshop is full but scientists interested in the project should contact Prof Paul Pearson, Cardiff University, UK.

3) Four UK members have been invited to participate in the ICDP training course in New Zealand on Active Fault Zone Drilling. These are: Carolyn Boulton (Liverpool), Catriona Menzies (Southampton), Jamie Coussens (Southampton) and David Smith (BGS).

4) Congratulations to Jack Lacey (SCOPSCO/Lake Ohrid PhD student) who has had his first lead author paper published:

Lacey, J.H., Francke, A., Leng, M.J., Vane, C.H., Wagner, B. 2014. A high resolution Late Glacial to Holocene record of environmental change in the Mediterranean from Lake Ohrid (Macedonia/Albania). International Journal of Earth Sciences. DOI 10.1007/s00531-014-1033-6.

June

1) A blog: Deep drilling and wedding proposals by Lauren Noakes (a light hearted look at the ICDP funding process)

If you want to understand the past climates, future hazards and potential resources of our planet then you need a group of excellent scientists with a plan and a really big drill. And a lot of money. The International Continental scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) has an annual budget of $5million with which it funds cutting edge research and provides operational support and drilling facilities. More information...

May

1) News on the SCOPSCO project in the ICDP-IODP journal (Scientific Drilling): Wagner, B., Wilke, T., Krastel, S., Zanchetta, G., Sulpizio, R., Reicherter, K., Leng, M., Grazhdani, A., Trajanovski, S., Francke A., Lindhorst, K., Cvetkoska, A., Reed, J.M., Zhang, X., Lacey, J.H., Wonik, T., Baumgarten, H., Vogel, H. 2014. The SCOPSCO drilling project recovers more than 1.2 million years of history from Lake Ohrid, Scientific Drilling, 17, 19-29.

April

1)An ICDP and ECORD sponsored Workshop, in March 2014, was held with 49 participants from 14 countries, to consider the utility of scientific drilling to overcome these issues and accelerate research of the Neoproterozoic (1.00 to 0.54 Ga) to earliest Cambrian (541 to ~520 Ma) rock record. The Neoproterozoic time slab challenges us with a hierarchy of questions, from the broadly profound, such as ‘why did complex, macroscopic life evolve on this planet some 600 million years ago?’, and ‘how likely is it that other Earth-like planets may have experienced the same?’, to the more detailed, such as ‘how do different but broadly coeval stratigraphic sections that contain distinctly different proxy records really relate to one another?’. Unlike most other ICDP and ECORD Workshop topics, this one was not centred on a single site or collection of sites in one area. Instead it was agreed that the remit of this initiative had to be ambitious: the questions are global in nature hence the drilling strategy had to be commensurate with addressing the questions regarding the time interval spanning ~1 Ga Ma to ~520 Ma for key successions located on a number of cratons. This ambition is a multi-decade endeavour that will only be realised through numerous coordinated, collaborative projects centred on both core and outcrop archives. The need for global coverage is that the questions being asked are ultimately about global Earth system change and addressing such questions requires the integration of numerous local/regional datasets in order to advance our understanding of global scale Earth system change. The ambition is to greatly increase the number of such records therefore a number of high priority sites were identified and discussions were held regarding establishing operating and management mechanisms for undertaking an integrated global drilling programme, constructing open-access data and sample archiving, and coordinating approaches to multi-national funding. In addition to the specific drilling projects, issues relating to developing and sustaining an overarching initiative were topics for discussion. Please contract Dan Condon for further details.

2) ICDP training course on active fault zone drilling

The International Continental scientific Drilling Program, ICDP, invites scientists from upcoming scientific drilling projects to apply for the: ICDP Training Course on Active Fault Zone Drilling to be held from October 6-10, 2014 in New Zealand. This training will touch upon relevant aspects of scientific drilling in active fault zones, including project planning and management, pre-site studies, drilling engineering, sample handling and storage, on-site analysis, downhole logging, permanent downhole seismic monitoring, and data management. The training course is recommended for graduate students and post-doctoral scientists involved in upcoming scientific drilling. Applications should include a letter of interest, CV, and at least two letters of support. Preference will be given to applicants involved in ICDP drilling projects, applicants from ICDP member countries, developing countries, and those from countries considering ICDP membership. For the successful candidates, costs including those for travelling, visa, accommodation and meals will be covered by the ICDP. Please submit your application to icdp-outreach@gfz-potsdam.de until June 30, 2014. Decisions will be communicated by mid July. More information about ICDP Training.

3) EGU General Assembly in Vienna

ICDP - ECORD/IODP Town Hall Meeting, Tuesday, 29 Apr, 19:00-20:00, Room B5.

ICDP and IODP scientists and program representatives will provide brief updates on current activities and future key research topics. These updates will be followed by an opportunity to get together over refreshments.

We would be pleased to welcome you also at the ECORD/IODP - ICDP booth (#55-56-57) and at our session "Major achievements and perspectives in scientific ocean and continental drilling (CL6.8/GMPV55)"; orals: Tuesday, 08:30-10:00 and 10:30-12:30, room Y9; posters: Tuesday 17:30-19:00.

February

1) Melanie Leng has been nominated to represent the International Continental scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) on the International Ocean Discovery Program (IOPD)/European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling (ECORD) outreach task force. More info...

2) The UK IODP Knowledge Exchange Fellow call is on the NERC website and will close on 6th May 2014. You can view the announcement of opportunity, and details of other KE fellow calls, here or by looking under ‘news’ on the NERC homepage.

3) News from the HSPDP project. The HSPDP drilling of the Afar sites is underway. Henry Lamb with German and Ethiopian colleagues will drill a pilot hole of around 50m length (200 ka) from Chew Bahir (UK target) in mid March. Full drilling will commence in the winter 2014.

2013

December

1) An update on the Deep Drilling of Lake Ohrid in "Geoscientist Online" by Prof Melanie Leng.

2) A UK based ICDP workshop was funded this year on: "Accelerating Neoproterozoic Research through Scientific Drilling" and there is a call for expressions of interest https://sites.google.com/site/drillingtheneoproterozoic/front-pa/workshop-logistics.

Please contact Dr Dan Condon or Dr Tony Prave for further details including attending a pre-workshop meeting in late January 2014 to discuss UK subgroups.

November

1) There have been three contributions to the ICDP-IODP journal (Scientific Drilling) this month from UK researchers.

S. P. Hesselbo, C. J. Bjerrum, L. A. Hinnov, C. MacNiocaill, K. G. Miller, J. B. Riding, B. van de Schootbrugge, and the Mochras Revisited Science Team. 2013. Mochras borehole revisited: a new global standard for Early Jurassic earth history, Scientific Drilling, 16, 81-91.

N. Kampman, A. Maskell, M. J. Bickle, J. P. Evans, M. Schaller, G. Purser, Z. Zhou, J. Gattacceca, E. S. Peitre, C. A. Rochelle, C. J. Ballentine, A. Busch, and Scientists of the GRDP. 2013. Scientific drilling and downhole fluid sampling of a natural CO2 reservoir, Green River, Utah, Scientific Drilling, 16, 33-43.

D. A. Hodell, L. Lourens, D. A. V. Stow, J. Hernández-Molina, C. A. Alvarez Zarikian, and the Shackleton Site Project Members. 2013. The "Shackleton Site" (IODP Site U1385) on the Iberian Margin. Scientific Drilling, 16, 13-19.

2) The ICDP have a new web page

The ICDP Science Conference delegates. Click to enlarge.

3) The ICDP Science Conference 2013 (Imaging the Past to Imagine our Future) was held from 11th-14th November.

More news on the outcomes of this conference will be circulated at a later date. John Ludden, Melanie Leng and Kathryn Goodenough represented ICDP-UK.

4) ICDP are now on twitter: @ICDPdrilling

The geological monoliths in the grounds of GFZ, Potsdam where the ICDP Science Conference was held. Note the large column of marble with blue (azurite?) veining.

5) The Thrill to Drill (over the next 10 years) by Prof Melanie Leng

Last week the International Continental scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) Science Conference was held in the historic Telegrafenberg in Potsdam, Germany. The aim of the conference was to debate and map ICDP's way forward over the next 5 – 10 years and develop a science plan for continental deep drilling. Melanie Leng gives us a brief overview.

September

1) News on the Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) project by Dr Nick Roberts of the British Geological Survey

2)Tanzania Onshore Paleogene Integrated Coring (TOPIC): Workshop funded by ICDP by Professor Paul Pearson

August

1) Workshop report: Mochras Borehole Revisited: A New Global standard for Early Jurassic Earth History by Stephen Hesselbo et al

2) PhD student Jack Lacey is working within the ICDP SCOPSCO project on Lake Ohrid, here he blogs about his experience during the first year of research.

July

1) NERC funds grant application associated with ICDP Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project

June

1) The International Continental scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) funding process - part 1 by Melanie Leng

January

1) News on the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program by Prof Melanie Leng

The ICDP Executive Committee and Assembly of Governors members at Matsukawa Geothermal Power Plant. Special thanks to our Japanese hosts headed by the Japanese EC member Shin'ichi Kuramoto from CDEX/JAMSTEC.