QICS: No evidence for impacts to molecular ecophysiology of ion or CO2 regulation in tissues of selected surface-dwelling bivalves in vicinity of CO2 release

Dataset description

Whilst sub-seabed Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) has the potential to remove a significant proportion of anthropogenic CO2 emissions at source, research is necessary to constrain the environmental impacts of potential future gas leaks from storage reservoirs. The QICS project (Quantifying and Monitoring Potential Ecosystem Impacts of Geological Carbons Storage) was established to improve our understanding of these potential impacts and to develop tools and best practice for monitoring sub-seabed CCS reservoirs. Exposure to increased environmental CO2 has been shown to raise the tissue pCO2 of many marine invertebrate species, leading to tissue acidosis and perturbations in both ion transport and bicarbonate buffering. These disturbances can cause downstream effects, seen as metabolic depression in susceptible organisms, compromising the role of particular species within an ecosystem and even causing the local extinction of species groups. To monitor the potential impact to surficial benthic megafauna, cages of bivalves (the common mussel Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758 and the king scallop Pecten maximus (Linnaeus, 1758)) were deployed at the gas release site and at a reference site?both within Ardmucknish Bay, Oban, Scotland. Replicate individuals were sampled at six time points over a 125-day period, which spanned both the 37-day injection and recovery phases of the experiment, in order to establish impacts to molecular physiology. Samples of bivalves were also simultaneously sampled from a reference site within the bay in order to contrast changes in physiology induced by the gas release with naturally variability in the physiological performance of both species. We present data on changes in the transcription of genes coding for key ionic and carbon dioxide regulatory proteins. There was no evidence of gene regulation of either selected carbonic anhydrases (CAx genes) or the alpha subunit of sodium potassium ATPAses (ATP1A genes) in individual bivalves collected from the CO2 gas release site, in either species. In the common mussel M. edulis there was only evidence for changes with time in the expression of genes coding for different classes of carbonic anhydrase. It was therefore concluded that the effects of the plume of elevated pCO2 on ion-regulatory gene transcription were negligible in both species. Whilst the analysed data from this current study do not constitute an impediment to the continued development of sub-seabed CCS as a climate mitigation strategy, further modelling is necessary to predict the consequences of larger or longer term leaks. Further analysis is also required in order to constrain the potential physiological impacts of gas leaks to benthic infaunal species and understand the mechanism of possible avoidance behaviour recorded in burrowing heart urchins Echinocardium cordatum (Pennant, 1777). This is a publication in QICS Special Issue - International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, Nicola Pratt et. al. Doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2014.10.001.

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Associated dataset(s)

NERC Project: QICS - Quantifying and monitoring environmental impacts of geological carbon storage (2010 - 2014)

Dataset details

Author(s) Nicola Pratt
Principal Investigator(s) Nicola Pratt
University of Southampton, National Oceanography Centre Southampton
Language English
Curator British Geological Survey
Supply media/format Not available
Storage format Not available
Frequency of update not applicable
Start of capture {ts '2010-05-01 00:00:00'} Not known
End of capture {ts '2014-11-07 00:00:00'} Before 7th November 2014
Online access URL http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1750583614002928
Lineage statement See the journal publication for details
Supplementary information NERC grant NE/H013881/1
Constraints
Access constraints intellectualPropertyRights (rights to financial benefit from and control of distribution of non-tangible property that is a result of creativity)
Use constraints intellectualPropertyRights (rights to financial benefit from and control of distribution of non-tangible property that is a result of creativity)
Additional info on constraints
Contact details
Department Enquiries
Organisation British Geological Survey
Address Environmental Science Centre, Nicker Hill, Keyworth
City Nottingham
County Nottinghamshire
Country United Kingdom
Postcode NG12 5GG
E-mail enquiries@bgs.ac.uk
Telephone +44 (0)115 936 3143
Fax +44 (0)115 936 3276
Keywords
Topic category code (ISO) geoscientificInformation (information pertaining to earth sciences)
Keywords CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE
Keyword source BGS Keyphrases
Spatial details
Spatial Reference System Not available
Dataset extent
Coverage (Lat/Long) North boundary : 
East boundary  : 
South boundary : 
West boundary  : 
Metadata
Metadata language English
Metadata last updated 3rd November 2016
Metadata standard compliance NERC profile of ISO19115:2003
Copyright and IPR
The copyright of materials derived from the British Geological Survey's work is vested in the Natural Environment Research Council [NERC]. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, or stored in a retrieval system of any nature, without the prior permission of the copyright holder, via the BGS Intellectual Property Rights Manager. Use by customers of information provided by the BGS, is at the customer's own risk. In view of the disparate sources of information at BGS's disposal, including such material donated to BGS, that BGS accepts in good faith as being accurate, the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) gives no warranty, expressed or implied, as to the quality or accuracy of the information supplied, or to the information's suitability for any use. NERC/BGS accepts no liability whatever in respect of loss, damage, injury or other occurence however caused.