QICS Data: Effect of a controlled sub-seabed release of CO2 on the biogeochemistry of shallow marine sediments, pore waters, and the overlying water (2012-2013)

Dataset description

The potential for leakage of CO2 from a storage reservoir into the overlying marine sediments and into the water column and the impacts on benthic ecosystems are major challenges The potential for leakage of CO2 from a storage reservoir into the overlying marine sediments and into the water column and the impacts on benthic ecosystems are major challenges associated with Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in subseafloor reservoirs. To investigate the consequences of CO2 leakage for the marine environment, a field-scale controlled CO2 release experiment was conducted in shallow, unconsolidated marine sediments. Changes of the chemical composition of the sediments, their pore waters and overlying water column were monitored before, during and up to 1 year after the 37-day long CO2 release from May 2012 to May 2013. In particular this focused on changes in the solid phase (physical properties, major and minor elemental composition, inorganic and organic carbon content), the pore water chemical composition (cations, anions, nutrients and the carbonate system parameters total alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon and isotopic signature of DIC) and the water column chemical composition (oxygen, nutrients, total alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon). This dataset was collected by the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) under the program QICS (Quantifying and monitoring environmental impacts of geological carbon storage) which was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), with support from the Scottish Government. The results are contained in an Excel file. QICS project website: www.bgs.ac.uk/qics/home.html. Lichtschlag et al. (2014) Effect of a controlled sub-seabed release of CO2 on the biogeochemistry of shallow marine sediments, their pore waters, and the overlying water column, http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1750583614003090 (doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2014.10.008).

Further information

For more information please contact:

Enquiries

Environmental Science Centre, Nicker Hill, Keyworth
Nottingham
NG12 5GG

Tel : +44 (0)115 936 3143
Fax :+44 (0)115 936 3276
Email :enquiries@bgs.ac.uk

Associated dataset(s)

NERC Project: QICS - Quantifying and monitoring environmental impacts of geological carbon storage (2010 - 2014)

Dataset details

Author(s) Anna Lichtschlag , Rachael James , Doug Connelly
Principal Investigator(s) Anna Lichtschlag
National Oceanography Centre, Southampton
Rachael James
National Oceanography Centre, Southampton
Doug Connelly
National Oceanography Centre, Southampton
Language English
Curator British Geological Survey
Supply media/format .xls; Version:N/A
Storage format Not available
Frequency of update not applicable
Start of capture {ts '2012-05-10 00:00:00'} Not known
End of capture {ts '2013-05-10 00:00:00'} 10th May 2013
Online access URL  
Lineage statement Samples of sediment, pore waters and water column were taken in 4 zones i) pre-injection, ii) during the gas injection, and iii) during 4 sampling campaigns conducted up to 1 year post-injection: Zone 1: Directly above the CO2 injection point Zone 2: 25 m away from the injection point Zone 3: 75 m away from the injection point Zone 4: 450 m away from the injection point A series of sediment cores (~20-25 cm long) were collected from the 4 zones that had different distance to the CO2 injection point. At each sampling campaign three sediment cores were collected in perspex tubes (5 cm inner diameter) from each zone and on each sampling campaign by Scuba diving and immediately transferred for processing to a temperature controlled room set to the in situ temperature (usually ~10 ˚C). One core was sub-sampled for solid phase sediment analyses and the remaining two cores were used for sediment pore water extraction. For solid phase analysis, the sediment cores were sliced at 2 cm depth intervals. A sub-sample (3 mL) of each section was transferred into a glass headspace vial containing 5 mL of 1 mol L-1 sodium hydroxide and crimp-sealed for methane analysis. Sub-samples for porosity and grain size were stored in pre-weighed plastic containers at 4 ˚C and the remainder of the sediment sample was freeze-dried for XRF analysis. Water samples were collected from onboard the research vessel Seòl Mara using a 5L Niskin bottle. Water samples were taken from 5 depths, ranging from 2 m below the sea surface to 1 m above the seafloor, with the absolute depth depending on the tidal range. Sub-samples were transferred into gas tight glass vials without headspace for DIC, TA and dissolved oxygen analyses. Additional sub-samples were frozen in plastic bottles for nutrient analyses. The major and minor element composition of the sediments was determined by X-ray fluorescence on fused glass beads for the major elements and on pellets pressed into bricks for the minor elements. Total inorganic carbon (TIC) and total carbon (TC) concentrations were measured with a CO2 coulometer equipped with an acidification module, and organic carbon (Corg) was calculated by subtracting the acid soluble fraction from the bulk carbon. Porosity was determined by mass difference between the wet sediment, and sediment dried in the oven at 60 ˚C for a minimum of 72 hours, assuming a sediment density of 2.6 g cm−3. Grain size was measured on the dried sediments using a Malvern Mastersize analyser after shaking the samples overnight in a 1% Calgon solution to disaggregate them. Oxygen concentrations were determined using the Winkler titration technique. DIC was measured using an infrared analyser to detect CO2 released from the sample after acidifying with 10 % H3PO4. Total alkalinity was determined by Gran titration. Cations were measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Anions were measured by ion exchange chromatography with 9 mmol L-1 NaCO3 as the eluent. The carbon isotopic composition of the DIC (δ13CDIC) was determined using a multiflow preparation system coupled to an continuous flow mass spectrometer. Total alkalinity was determined by titration against 0.0005 mol L-1 HCl using a mixture of methyl red and methylene blue as an indicator. Total dissolved sulphide concentrations (H2S + HS- + S2-) were determined using the diamine complexation method. Concentrations of methane were determined by gas chromatography. The data in the table is the format Dx/Dx (day relative to injection). D-6/-7: 10/11 May 2012 D13/14: 30/31 May 2012 D34/D35: 20/21 June 2012 D41/D42: 27/28 June 2012 D53/D54: 9 July/10 July 2012 D126/D127: 18/20 September 2012 D356/D357/D358: 8/9/10 May 2013
Supplementary information Lichtschlag et al. (2014) Effect of a controlled sub-seabed release of CO2 on the biogeochemistry of shallow marine sediments, their pore waters, and the overlying water column, http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1750583614003090 (doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2014.10.008). QICS project website: www.bgs.ac.uk/qics/home.html.
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Contact details
Department Enquiries
Organisation British Geological Survey
Address Environmental Science Centre, Nicker Hill, Keyworth
City Nottingham
County Nottinghamshire
Country United Kingdom
Postcode NG12 5GG
E-mail enquiries@bgs.ac.uk
Telephone +44 (0)115 936 3143
Fax +44 (0)115 936 3276
Keywords
Topic category code (ISO) geoscientificInformation (information pertaining to earth sciences)
Keywords BIOGEOCHEMISTRY
CARBON
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT
METALS
SEDIMENTS
STORAGE
Keyword source BGS Keyphrases
Spatial details
Spatial Reference System Not available
Dataset extent
Coverage (Lat/Long) North boundary : 56.49
East boundary  : -5.42
South boundary : 56.49
West boundary  : -5.42
Metadata
Metadata language English
Metadata last updated 14th December 2016
Metadata standard compliance NERC profile of ISO19115:2003
Copyright and IPR
The copyright of materials derived from the British Geological Survey's work is vested in the Natural Environment Research Council [NERC]. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, or stored in a retrieval system of any nature, without the prior permission of the copyright holder, via the BGS Intellectual Property Rights Manager. Use by customers of information provided by the BGS, is at the customer's own risk. In view of the disparate sources of information at BGS's disposal, including such material donated to BGS, that BGS accepts in good faith as being accurate, the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) gives no warranty, expressed or implied, as to the quality or accuracy of the information supplied, or to the information's suitability for any use. NERC/BGS accepts no liability whatever in respect of loss, damage, injury or other occurence however caused.