Planning4Minerals header
 
 Home
 Planning
  Influence of EU
 Role of central government
 Role of regional bodies
 Enviro protection/heritage
 Role of elected members
 Local communities
 Planning process
  Sustainability
 Future aggregate sites
 Commercial interests
 Planning permission
 Restoration
 Enforcing planning rights
 Environment
  Landscape
 Natural and built heritage
 Noise and vibration
 Transport and traffic
 Air quality
 Water resources
 Mineral waste
 Biodiversity
 Geodiversity
 Resources
  What are aggregates?
 Resources vs Reserves
 Location of aggregates
 Quarry design/restoration
 Aggregate process
 Aggregate testing
 Economics
  Aggregates use
 Supply and demand
 Value to economy
 Regional supply issues
 Local economy
 Transportation issues
 Links
 Glossary
 Site map
 Notes for trainers
 Downloads
   
  
Economics

Extent of permitted reserves
For England and Wales, detailed information on permitted reserves of primary aggregates in active and inactive sites, by Region and by environmental designation is published in four-yearly Aggregate Minerals Surveys. The last survey was for 2001 and the results are summarised in Table 2. There are no comparable data for Scotland or Northern Ireland.

Of the total permitted reserves of 6 960 million tonnes in England and Wales in 2001, crushed rock accounted for 89%. Of total crushed rock reserves, limestone/dolomite accounted for 62%, igneous rock 18% and sandstone for almost all of the remainder.
     
There is an almost total absence of hard rock suitable for use as crushed rock aggregate in southern and eastern England where demand is high. This is balanced by increased extraction in, and transport from, the South West and East Midlands.
 
The distribution of reserves is very uneven but broadly reflects geology and demand.
  Resources and reserves in cross section.

Resources and reserves in cross section.

There is an almost total absence of hard rock suitable for use as crushed rock aggregate in southern and eastern England where demand is high. This is balanced by increased extraction in, and transport from, the South West and East Midlands. Some 32% of all reserves are located in the East Midlands and 21% in the South West. Both regions have large resources of limestone and have good transport links to the South East with much aggregate being moved by rail.
 

Thousand tonnes

Region

Sand & gravel

Crushed rock

Total

South West

50 276

1 385 664

1 435 940

South East

141 545

72 803

214 348

London

3 185

0

3 185

East of England

184 795

15 351

200 146

East Midlands

98 747

2 165 789

2 264 536

West Midlands

143 809

309 486

453 295

North West

57 776

346 215

403 991

Yorkshire & the Humber

50 880

470 513

521 393

North East

21 377

258 870

280 247

England

752 390

5 024 691

5 777 081

South Wales

7 651

647 677

655 328

North Wales

23 120

505 196

528 316

Wales

30 771

1 152 873

1 183 644

England & Wales

783 161

6 177 564

6 960 725

For aggregate and non-aggregate uses.

Table 2. Total permitted reserves of aggregate minerals for England and Wales, 2001.

Source: Collation of the results of the 2001 Aggregate Minerals Survey for England and Wales, BGS.

. . . more